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Lessons from obesity prevention for the prevention of mental disorders: The primordial prevention approach

Hayward, J, Jacka, FN, Waters, E and Allender, S 2014, Lessons from obesity prevention for the prevention of mental disorders: The primordial prevention approach, BMC Psychiatry, vol. 14, no. 1, Article number 254, pp. 1-4, doi: 10.1186/s12888-014-0254-3.

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Title Lessons from obesity prevention for the prevention of mental disorders: The primordial prevention approach
Author(s) Hayward, J
Jacka, FNORCID iD for Jacka, FN orcid.org/0000-0002-9825-0328
Waters, E
Allender, S
Journal name BMC Psychiatry
Volume number 14
Issue number 1
Season Article number 254
Start page 1
End page 4
Total pages 4
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2014-09
ISSN 1471-244X
Keyword(s) Common mental disorders
Complex intervention
Intervention design
Obesity prevention
Prevention
Systems
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
MEDITERRANEAN DIETARY PATTERN
COMMUNITY-BASED INTERVENTION
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
GATEHOUSE PROJECT
SCHOOL GIRLS
DEPRESSION
ADOLESCENTS
HEALTH
METAANALYSIS
Summary Background: Emerging evidence supports a relationship between risk factors for obesity and the genesis of the common mental disorders, depression and anxiety. This suggests common mental disorders should be considered as a form of non-communicable disease, preventable through the modification of lifestyle behaviours, particularly diet and physical activity.Discussion: Obesity prevention research since the 1970's represents a considerable body of knowledge regarding strategies to modify diet and physical activity and so there may be clear lessons from obesity prevention that apply to the prevention of mental disorders. For obesity, as for common mental disorders, adolescence represents a key period of vulnerability. In this paper we briefly discuss relationships between modifiable lifestyle risk factors and mental health, lifestyle risk factor interventions in obesity prevention research, the current state of mental health prevention, and the implications of current applications of systems thinking in obesity prevention research for lifestyle interventions.Summary: We propose a potential focus for future mental health promotion interventions and emphasise the importance of lessons available from other lifestyle modification intervention programmes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12888-014-0254-3
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Biomed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067237

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.