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Nutritional psychiatry research: an emerging discipline and its intersection with global urbanization, environmental challenges and the evolutionary mismatch

Logan, AC and Jacka, FN 2014, Nutritional psychiatry research: an emerging discipline and its intersection with global urbanization, environmental challenges and the evolutionary mismatch, Journal of Physiological Anthropology, vol. 33, no. 22, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.1186/1880-6805-33-22.

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Title Nutritional psychiatry research: an emerging discipline and its intersection with global urbanization, environmental challenges and the evolutionary mismatch
Author(s) Logan, AC
Jacka, FNORCID iD for Jacka, FN orcid.org/0000-0002-9825-0328
Journal name Journal of Physiological Anthropology
Volume number 33
Issue number 22
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1880-6805
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physiology
MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER
GLYCATION END-PRODUCTS
COMMON MENTAL-DISORDERS
BLOOD-BRAIN-BARRIER
HIGH-FAT DIET
POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER
NEIGHBORHOOD FOOD ENVIRONMENT
COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY
CHILDRENS PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
COMMUNITY-DWELLING ADULTS
Summary In 21st-century public health, rapid urbanization and mental health disorders are a growing global concern. The relationship between diet, brain function and the risk of mental disorders has been the subject of intense research in recent years. In this review, we examine some of the potential socioeconomic and environmental challenges detracting from the traditional dietary patterns that might otherwise support positive mental health. In the context of urban expansion, climate change, cultural and technological changes and the global industrialization and ultraprocessing of food, findings related to nutrition and mental health are connected to some of the most pressing issues of our time. The research is also of relevance to matters of biophysiological anthropology. We explore some aspects of a potential evolutionary mismatch between our ancestral past (Paleolithic, Neolithic) and the contemporary nutritional environment. Changes related to dietary acid load, advanced glycation end products and microbiota (via dietary choices and cooking practices) may be of relevance to depression, anxiety and other mental disorders. In particular, the results of emerging studies demonstrate the importance of prenatal and early childhood dietary practices within the developmental origins of health and disease concept. There is still much work to be done before these population studies and their mirrored advances in bench research can provide translation to clinical medicine and public health policy. However, the clear message is that in the midst of a looming global epidemic, we ignore nutrition at our peril.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1880-6805-33-22
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Biomed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067241

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.