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Paradigm shift to enhanced water supply planning through augmented grids, scarcity pricing and adaptive factory water : a system dynamics approach

Sahin,O., Siems, R.S., Stewart, R.A. and Porter, Michael G. 2016, Paradigm shift to enhanced water supply planning through augmented grids, scarcity pricing and adaptive factory water : a system dynamics approach, Environmental modelling and software, vol. 75, pp. 348-361, doi: 10.1016/j.envsoft.2014.05.018.

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Title Paradigm shift to enhanced water supply planning through augmented grids, scarcity pricing and adaptive factory water : a system dynamics approach
Author(s) Sahin,O.
Siems, R.S.
Stewart, R.A.
Porter, Michael G.
Journal name Environmental modelling and software
Volume number 75
Start page 348
End page 361
Total pages 14
Publisher Pergamon Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2016-01
ISSN 1364-8152
Keyword(s) desalination
forecasting
scarcity pricing
system dynamics modelling
temporary drought pricing
water security
Summary This paper details a system dynamics model developed to simulate proposed changes to water governance through the integration of supply, demand and asset management processes. To effectively accomplish this, interconnected feedback loops in tariff structures, demand levels and financing capacity are included in the model design, representing the first comprehensive life-cycle modelling of potable water systems. A number of scenarios were applied to Australia's populated South-east Queensland region, demonstrating that introducing temporary drought pricing (i.e. progressive water prices set inverse with availability), in conjunction with supply augmentation through rain-independent sources, is capable of efficiently providing water security in the future. Modelling demonstrated that this alternative tariff structure reduced demand in scarcity periods thereby preserving supply, whilst revenues are maintained to build new water supply infrastructure. In addition to exploring alternative tariffs, the potential benefits of using adaptive pressure-retarded osmosis desalination plants for both potable water and power generation was explored. This operation of these plants for power production, when they would otherwise be idle, shows promise in reducing their net energy and carbon footprints. Stakeholders in industry, government and academia were engaged in model development and validation. The constructed model displays how water resource systems can be reorganised to cope with systemic change and uncertainty.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.envsoft.2014.05.018
Field of Research 120599 Urban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 960799 Environmental Policy
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067255

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Accounting, Economics and Finance
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