Effect of changes to the school food environment on eating behaviours and/or body weight in children: a systematic review

Driessen, C. E., Cameron, A. J., Thornton, L. E., Lai, S. K. and Barnett, L. M. 2014, Effect of changes to the school food environment on eating behaviours and/or body weight in children: a systematic review, Obesity reviews, vol. 15, no. 12, pp. 968-982, doi: 10.1111/obr.12224.

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Title Effect of changes to the school food environment on eating behaviours and/or body weight in children: a systematic review
Author(s) Driessen, C. E.
Cameron, A. J.ORCID iD for Cameron, A. J. orcid.org/0000-0002-0568-5497
Thornton, L. E.ORCID iD for Thornton, L. E. orcid.org/0000-0001-8759-8671
Lai, S. K.
Barnett, L. M.ORCID iD for Barnett, L. M. orcid.org/0000-0002-9731-625X
Journal name Obesity reviews
Volume number 15
Issue number 12
Start page 968
End page 982
Total pages 15
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, England
Publication date 2014-12
ISSN 1467-789X
Keyword(s) BMI
diet
food environment
school
Summary Previous school obesity-prevention reviews have included multi-component interventions. Here, we aimed to review the evidence for the effect of isolated food environment interventions on both eating behaviours (including food purchasing) and/or body weight. Five electronic databases were searched (last updated 30 November 2013). Of the 1,002 unique papers identified, 55 reported on school food environment changes, based on a review of titles and abstracts. Thirty-seven further papers were excluded, for not meeting the inclusion criteria. The final selection consisted of 18 papers (14 United States, 4 United Kingdom). Two studies had a body mass index (BMI) outcome, 14 assessed purchasing or eating behaviours and two studies assessed both weight and behaviour. Seventeen of 18 papers reported a positive outcome on either BMI (or change in BMI) or the healthfulness of food sold or consumed. Two studies were rated as strong quality and 11 as weak. Only three studies included a control group. A school environment supportive of healthy eating is essential to combat heavy marketing of unhealthy food. Modification of the school food environment (including high-level policy changes at state or national level) can have a positive impact on eating behaviours. A need exists, however, for further high-quality studies.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/obr.12224
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID NHMRC 1013507
Copyright notice ©2014, Wiley-Blackwell
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067260

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