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High dose vitamin C supplementation increases skeletal muscle vitamin C concentration and SVCT2 transporter expression but does not alter redox status in healthy males.

Mason, Shaun, Baptista, R, Della Gatta, Paul, Yousif, A, Russell, Aaron and Wadley, Glenn 2014, High dose vitamin C supplementation increases skeletal muscle vitamin C concentration and SVCT2 transporter expression but does not alter redox status in healthy males., Free Radical Biology and Medicine, vol. 77, pp. 130-138, doi: 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2014.09.013.

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Title High dose vitamin C supplementation increases skeletal muscle vitamin C concentration and SVCT2 transporter expression but does not alter redox status in healthy males.
Author(s) Mason, ShaunORCID iD for Mason, Shaun orcid.org/0000-0002-6138-2239
Baptista, R
Della Gatta, Paul
Yousif, AORCID iD for Yousif, A orcid.org/0000-0002-7323-9501
Russell, AaronORCID iD for Russell, Aaron orcid.org/0000-0002-6617-4359
Wadley, Glenn
Journal name Free Radical Biology and Medicine
Volume number 77
Start page 130
End page 138
Total pages 9
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2014-09-18
ISSN 1873-4596
Keyword(s) antioxidant
reactive oxygen species
skeletal muscle
sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2
vitamin c
freeradicals
reactiveoxygenspecies
Free radicals
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Endocrinology & Metabolism
L-ASCORBIC-ACID
OXIDATIVE STRESS
ACUTE EXERCISE
ADAPTATIONS
DEPLETION
PROTEINS
MYOTUBES
PLASMA
Summary Antioxidant vitamin C (VC) supplementation is of potential clinical benefit to individuals with skeletal muscle oxidative stress. However there is a paucity of data reporting on the bioavailability of high dose oral VC in human skeletal muscle. We aimed to establish the time-course accumulation of VC in skeletal muscle and plasma during high dose VC supplementation in healthy individuals. Concurrently we investigated effects of VC supplementation on expression levels of the key skeletal muscle VC transporter, sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) and intramuscular redox and mitochondrial measures. Eight healthy males completed a randomized placebo-controlled, cross-over trial involving supplementation with ascorbic acid (2×500mg/day) over 42 days. Participants underwent muscle and blood sampling on days 0, 1, 7 and 42 during each treatment. VC supplementation significantly increased skeletal muscle VC concentration after 7 days, which was maintained at 42 days (VC: 3.0±0.2 [mean±SEM] mg/100gwet weight [ww] to 3.9±0.4mg/100g ww versus placebo: 3.1±0.3mg/100g ww to 2.9±0.2mg/100g ww, p=0.001). Plasma VC increased after 1 day, which was maintained at 42 days (VC: 61.0±6.1μmol/l to 111.5±10.4μmol/l versus placebo: 60.7±5.3μmol/l to 59.2±4.8μmol/l, p<0.001). VC supplementation significantly increased skeletal muscle SVCT2 protein expression (main treatment effect p=0.006) but did not alter skeletal muscle redox measures or citrate synthase activity. A main finding of our study was that 7 days of high dose VC supplementation was required to significantly increase skeletal muscle vitamin C concentration in healthy males. Our findings implicate regular high dose vitamin C supplementation as a means to safely increase skeletal muscle vitamin C concentration without impairing intramuscular ascorbic acid transport, antioxidant concentrations or citrate synthase activity.
DOI 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2014.09.013
Field of Research 110604 Sports Medicine
111699 Medical Physiology not elsewhere classified
0304 Medicinal And Biomolecular Chemistry
0601 Biochemistry And Cell Biology
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067262

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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