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Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of internet-based cognitive-behavioural therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Kyrios,M, Nedeljkovic,M, Moulding,R, Klein,B, Austin,D, Meyer,D and Ahern,C 2014, Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of internet-based cognitive-behavioural therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder., BMC Psychiatry, vol. 14, no. Article number 209, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/1471-244X-14-209.

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Title Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of internet-based cognitive-behavioural therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Author(s) Kyrios,M
Nedeljkovic,M
Moulding,RORCID iD for Moulding,R orcid.org/0000-0001-7779-3166
Klein,B
Austin,DORCID iD for Austin,D orcid.org/0000-0002-1296-3555
Meyer,D
Ahern,C
Journal name BMC Psychiatry
Volume number 14
Issue number Article number 209
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2014-07
ISSN 1471-244X
Keyword(s) CBT
Cognitive-behaviour therapy
Mental health
Obsessive-compulsive disorder
OCD
Online intervention
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
PSYCHIATRY, SCI
ANXIETY DISORDERS
MENTAL-HEALTH
TREATMENT-SEEKING
PRIMARY-CARE
PSYCHOLOGICAL TREATMENTS
ADMINISTERED TREATMENT
SERVICE UTILIZATION
PANIC DISORDER
CLINICAL-TRIAL
METAANALYSIS
Summary Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a common chronic psychiatric disorder that constitutes a leading cause of disability. Although Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy (CBT) has been shown to be an effective treatment for OCD, this specialised treatment is unavailable to many due to access issues and the social stigma associated with seeing a mental health specialist. Internet-based psychological treatments have shown to provide effective, accessible and affordable treatment for a range of anxiety disorders, and two Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) have demonstrated the efficacy and acceptability of internet-based CBT (iCBT) for OCD, as compared to waitlist or supportive therapy. Although these initial findings are promising, they do not isolate the specific effect of iCBT. This paper details the study protocol for the first randomised control trial evaluating the efficacy of therapist-assisted iCBT for OCD, as compared to a matched control intervention; internet-based therapist-assisted progressive relaxation training (iPRT). It will aim to examine whether therapist-assisted iCBT is an acceptable and efficacious treatment, and to examine how effectiveness is influenced by patient characteristics.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-244X-14-209
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Biomed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067272

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.