Application of the gradient boosted method in randomised clinical trials: participant variables that contribute to depression treatment efficacy of duloxetine, SSRIs or placebo

Dodd,S, Berk,M, Kelin,K, Zhang,Q, Eriksson,E, Deberdt,W and Craig Nelson,J 2014, Application of the gradient boosted method in randomised clinical trials: participant variables that contribute to depression treatment efficacy of duloxetine, SSRIs or placebo, Journal of affective disorders, vol. 168, pp. 284-293, doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2014.05.014.

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Title Application of the gradient boosted method in randomised clinical trials: participant variables that contribute to depression treatment efficacy of duloxetine, SSRIs or placebo
Author(s) Dodd,SORCID iD for Dodd,S orcid.org/0000-0002-7918-4636
Berk,MORCID iD for Berk,M orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Kelin,K
Zhang,Q
Eriksson,E
Deberdt,W
Craig Nelson,J
Journal name Journal of affective disorders
Volume number 168
Start page 284
End page 293
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2014-10-15
ISSN 1573-2517
Keyword(s) Depression
Duloxetine
Gradient Boosted method
Randomised clinical trial
SSRI
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Clinical Neurology
Psychiatry
Neurosciences & Neurology
SEROTONIN-REUPTAKE INHIBITORS
PAROXETINE-CONTROLLED TRIAL
60 MG
DOUBLE-BLIND
ELDERLY-PATIENTS
NON-INFERIORITY
DISORDER
REMISSION
PREDICTORS
TOLERABILITY
Summary Randomised, placebo-controlled trials of treatments for depression typically collect outcomes data but traditionally only analyse data to demonstrate efficacy and safety. Additional post-hoc statistical techniques may reveal important insights about treatment variables useful when considering inter-individual differences amongst depressed patients. This paper aims to examine the Gradient Boosted Model (GBM), a statistical technique that uses regression tree analyses and can be applied to clinical trial data to identify and measure variables that may influence treatment outcomes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2014.05.014
Field of Research 110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067307

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
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