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Understanding the link between body dissatisfaction and binge eating: a model comparison approach

Holmes, Milli Louise 2014, Understanding the link between body dissatisfaction and binge eating: a model comparison approach, Doctor of Psychology (Clinical) thesis, School of Psychology, Deakin University.

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Title Understanding the link between body dissatisfaction and binge eating: a model comparison approach
Author Holmes, Milli Louise
Institution Deakin University
School School of Psychology
Faculty Faculty of Health
Degree type Research doctorate
Degree name Doctor of Psychology (Clinical)
Thesis advisor Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, MatthewORCID iD for Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-1145-6057
Skouteris, Helen
Date submitted 2014-01-07
Keyword(s) body dissatisfaction
binge eating
dual pathways model
escape from awareness model
objectification theory model
Summary  This thesis explored the association between body dissatisfaction and binge eating by comparing three competing theoretical frameworks. Study I utilised a cross-sectional design and collectively these findings suggest the superiority of the dual pathway model (dietary restraint and negative affect) over the objectification theory and the escape model. The purpose of Study II was then to extend on the findings from Study I by further examining in real-time the model/theory that most strongly explained the body dissatisfaction-binge eating relationship. Participants were prompted at random intervals seven times daily across the course of a week to self-report their state body dissatisfaction, current mood experiences, and eating practices. Results revealed that negative mood, but not dietary restraint, significantly mediated the state body dissatisfaction-binge eating relationship. These results highlight that the dual pathway model is robust, but raise the possibility that the dietary restraint path in the model is not well operationalized. In light of the non-significant mediating effect of dietary restraint, this led the researcher to identify various modeling alternatives to further understand the mediating influences of the pathways of negative affect and dietary restraint.
Language eng
Field of Research 170110 Psychological Methodology, Design and Analysis
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
Description of original 168 pp.; + appendices
Copyright notice ┬ęThe author
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067343

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.