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Development of play profiles : influence of disability on children's play

Emblen, Teresa 2014, Development of play profiles : influence of disability on children's play, Master of Applied Science thesis, School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University.

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Title Development of play profiles : influence of disability on children's play
Author Emblen, Teresa
Institution Deakin University
School School of Health and Social Development
Faculty Faculty of Health
Degree type Research masters
Degree name Master of Applied Science
Thesis advisor Stagnitti, Karen
Date submitted 2014-07
Keyword(s) play
developmental disabilities
children
Autistic Spectrum Disorder
Down syndrome
developmental delay
physical disabilities
Summary Occupational therapists value play as a significant occupation in a child’s life and use play both as a means and as an end in itself to support development. This thesis explores the nature of play in children with developmental disabilities, seeking to determine whether there are consistent patterns of play specific to different disability categories. An extensive literature review of play and disability was completed, and Cooper’s (2000) model of play is used to organize the literature findings. This study investigated differences in play behaviour in 50 children diagnosed with Autistic Spectrum Disorder, Down syndrome, Developmental Delay and Physical impairments, aged 4 to 6 years 6 months who attended educational facilities in a regional centre in South East Queensland. Quantitative and qualitative play behaviour was assessed using two measures, Revised Knox Preschool Play Scale (Knox, 2008) and the Child Initiated Pretend Play Assessment (Stagnitti, 2007) with the Australian Developmental Screening Test (Burdon, 1993) used to determine developmental age to eliminate this as a potential confounding variable when statistically analyzing the results.
Cognitive, language and fine motor abilities were found to have a statistically significant impact on play ability rather than the different disability groupings. Children with Down syndrome had significantly more imitative play actions than any other disability grouping. Cooper’s (2000) model was found to be a useful tool to analyze differing play characteristics according to different disability groupings. Modifications to Cooper’s original model of play to more accurately depict play characteristics are proposed.
Language eng
Field of Research 111403 Paediatrics
110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl Physiotherapy)
Socio Economic Objective 920201 Allied Health Therapies (excl. Mental Health Services)
Description of original 214 pages : illustrations, tables
Copyright notice ┬ęThe Author. All Rights Reserved
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067410

Document type: Thesis
Collections: Higher degree theses (full text)
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.