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Randomized controlled trial examining the effects of fish oil and multivitamin supplementation on the incorporation of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids into red blood cells

Pipingas, Andrew, Cockerell, Robyn, Grima, Natalie, Sinclair, Andrew, Stough, Con, Scholey, Andrew, Myers, Stephen, Croft, Kevin, Sali, Avni and Pase, Matthew P. 2014, Randomized controlled trial examining the effects of fish oil and multivitamin supplementation on the incorporation of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids into red blood cells, Nutrients, vol. 6, no. 5, pp. 1956-1970, doi: 10.3390/nu6051956.

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Title Randomized controlled trial examining the effects of fish oil and multivitamin supplementation on the incorporation of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids into red blood cells
Author(s) Pipingas, Andrew
Cockerell, Robyn
Grima, Natalie
Sinclair, Andrew
Stough, Con
Scholey, Andrew
Myers, Stephen
Croft, Kevin
Sali, Avni
Pase, Matthew P.
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 6
Issue number 5
Start page 1956
End page 1970
Total pages 15
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2014-05
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) Controlled trial (RCT)
Diet
Fatty acid
Fish oils
Multivitamins
n-3
Randomized
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
ERYTHROCYTE-MEMBRANES
COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE
FOLIC-ACID
OMEGA-3-FATTY-ACIDS
SERUM
PLASMA
HEALTH
ADULTS
RATS
Summary The present randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-groups clinical trial examined the effects of fish oil and multivitamin supplementation on the incorporation of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids into red blood cells. Healthy adult humans (n = 160) were randomized to receive 6 g of fish oil, 6 g of fish oil plus a multivitamin, 3 g of fish oil plus a multivitamin or a placebo daily for 16 weeks. Treatment with 6 g of fish oil, with or without a daily multivitamin, led to higher eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) composition at endpoint. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) composition was unchanged following treatment. The long chain LC n-3 PUFA index was only higher, compared to placebo, in the group receiving the combination of 6 g of fish oil and the multivitamin. Analysis by gender revealed that all treatments increased EPA incorporation in females while, in males, EPA was only significantly increased by the 6 g fish oil multivitamin combination. There was considerable individual variability in the red blood cell incorporation of EPA and DHA at endpoint. Gender contributed to a large proportion of this variability with females generally showing higher LC n-3 PUFA composition at endpoint. In conclusion, the incorporation of LC n-3 PUFA into red blood cells was influenced by dosage, the concurrent intake of vitamin/minerals and gender.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu6051956
Field of Research 090899 Food Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, MDPI
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067522

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.