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A meta-analysis of the effects of measuring theory of planned behaviour constructs on behaviour within prospective studies

Mankarious, Evon and Kothe, Emily 2014, A meta-analysis of the effects of measuring theory of planned behaviour constructs on behaviour within prospective studies, Health psychology review, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 190-204, doi: 10.1080/17437199.2014.927722.

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Title A meta-analysis of the effects of measuring theory of planned behaviour constructs on behaviour within prospective studies
Author(s) Mankarious, Evon
Kothe, EmilyORCID iD for Kothe, Emily orcid.org/0000-0003-1210-0554
Journal name Health psychology review
Volume number 9
Issue number 2
Start page 190
End page 204
Total pages 14
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2014-07-07
ISSN 1743-7199
1743-7202
Keyword(s) health behaviour
measurement reactivity
meta-analysis
the mere measurement effect
theory of planned behaviour
Summary Measurement reactivity effects, such as the mere measurement effect, have been proposed as a reason for behavioural changes in a number of theory of planned behaviour intervention studies. However, it is unclear whether such changes are the result of the mere measurement effect or of other artefacts of intervention study design. The aim of this study is to determine the size and direction of changes in health behaviours from baseline to follow-up in prospective studies using the theory of planned behaviour. Electronic databases were searched for the theory of planned behaviour studies which measured health behaviours at two or more time points. Change in behaviour was calculated for all studies. Sixty-six studies were included. Mean effect sizes across all studies were small and negative (d = -.03). Effect size was moderated by behaviour, behaviour type and follow-up length. Subgroup analyses showed significant decreases in socially undesirable behaviour (d = -.28), binge drinking (d = -.17), risk driving (d = -.20), sugar snack consumption (d = -.43) and sun-protective behaviour (d = -.18). Measurement of intention at baseline resulted in significant decreases in undesirable behaviour. Changes in undesirable behaviours reported in other studies may be the result of the mere measurement effect.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/17437199.2014.927722
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067626

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Tue, 25 Nov 2014, 14:21:13 EST

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