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Reasoned versus reactive prediction of behaviour: a meta-analysis of the prototype willingness model

Todd, Jemma, Kothe, Emily, Mullan, Barbara and Monds, Lauren 2016, Reasoned versus reactive prediction of behaviour: a meta-analysis of the prototype willingness model, Health psychology review, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 1-24, doi: 10.1080/17437199.2014.922895.

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Title Reasoned versus reactive prediction of behaviour: a meta-analysis of the prototype willingness model
Author(s) Todd, Jemma
Kothe, EmilyORCID iD for Kothe, Emily orcid.org/0000-0003-1210-0554
Mullan, Barbara
Monds, Lauren
Journal name Health psychology review
Volume number 10
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 24
Total pages 24
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1743-7199
1743-7202
Keyword(s) health behaviour
health models
meta-analysis
prototype willingness model
Summary The prototype willingness model (PWM) was designed to extend expectancy-value models of health behaviour by also including a heuristic, or social reactive pathway, to better explain health-risk behaviours in adolescents and young adults. The pathway includes prototype, i.e., images of a typical person who engages in a behaviour, and willingness to engage in behaviour. The current study describes a meta-analysis of predictive research using the PWM and explores the role of the heuristic pathway and intentions in predicting behaviour. Eighty-one studies met inclusion criteria. Overall, the PWM was supported and explained 20.5% of the variance in behaviour. Willingness explained 4.9% of the variance in behaviour over and above intention, although intention tended to be more strongly related to behaviour than was willingness. The strength of the PWM relationships tended to vary according to the behaviour being tested, with alcohol consumption being the behaviour best explained. Age was also an important moderator, and, as expected, PWM behaviour was best accounted for within adolescent samples. Results were heterogeneous even after moderators were taken into consideration. This meta-analysis provides support for the PWM and may be used to inform future interventions that can be tailored for at-risk populations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/17437199.2014.922895
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Taylor & Francis
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067630

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 27 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 16 times in Scopus
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Created: Mon, 24 Nov 2014, 09:31:41 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.