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Prolonged and flexible primary moult overlaps extensively with breeding in beach-nesting Hooded Plovers Thinornis rubricollis

Rogers,KG, Rogers,DI and Weston,MA 2014, Prolonged and flexible primary moult overlaps extensively with breeding in beach-nesting Hooded Plovers Thinornis rubricollis, Ibis, vol. 156, no. 4, pp. 840-849, doi: 10.1111/ibi.12184.

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Title Prolonged and flexible primary moult overlaps extensively with breeding in beach-nesting Hooded Plovers Thinornis rubricollis
Author(s) Rogers,KG
Rogers,DI
Weston,MAORCID iD for Weston,MA orcid.org/0000-0002-8717-0410
Journal name Ibis
Volume number 156
Issue number 4
Start page 840
End page 849
Total pages 10
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication England, London
Publication date 2014-10
ISSN 0019-1019
1474-919X
Keyword(s) breeding
feather replacement
moult sequence
moult timing
nest failure
plasticity
sex-differences
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
ornithology
zoology
Avian Primary Molt
annual cycle
wing-molt
birds
fly catchers
assemblages
disturbance
Australia
responses
Summary We present the first report of complete overlap of breeding and moult in a shorebird. In southeastern Australia, Hooded Plovers Thinornis rubricollis spend their entire lives on oceanic beaches, where they exhibit biparental care. Population moult encompassed the 6-month breeding season. Moult timing was estimated using the Underhill-Zucchini method for Type 2 data with a power transformation to accommodate sexual differences in rates of moult progression in the early and late stages of moult. Average moult durations were long in females (170.3 ± 14.2 days), and even longer in males (210.3 ± 13.5 days). Breeding status was known for most birds in our samples, and many active breeders (especially males) were also growing primaries. Females delayed the onset of primary moult but were able to increase the speed of moult and continue breeding, completing moult at about the same time as males. The mechanism by which this was achieved appeared to be flexibility in moult sequence. All moult formulae fell on one of two linked moult sequences, one faster than the other. The slower sequence had fewer feathers growing concurrently and also had formulae indicating suspended moults. Switching between sequences via common formulae is possible at many points during the moult cycle, and three of 12 recaptures were confirmed to have switched sequences in the same moult season. Hooded Plovers thus have a prolonged primary moult with the flexibility to change their rate of moult; this may facilitate high levels of replacement clutches that are associated with passive nest defence and low reproductive success. © 2014 British Ornithologists' Union.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/ibi.12184
Field of Research 060899 Zoology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 960802 Coastal and Estuarine Flora
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067795

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