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Weeds and wildlife: perceptions and practices of weed managers

Carlos,EH, Gibson,M and Weston,M 2014, Weeds and wildlife: perceptions and practices of weed managers, Conservation and society, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 54-64, doi: 10.4103/0972-4923.132131.

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Title Weeds and wildlife: perceptions and practices of weed managers
Author(s) Carlos,EH
Gibson,M
Weston,MORCID iD for Weston,M orcid.org/0000-0002-8717-0410
Journal name Conservation and society
Volume number 12
Issue number 1
Start page 54
End page 64
Total pages 10
Publisher Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
Place of publication Mumbai, India
Publication date 2014
ISSN 0972-4923
0975-3133
Keyword(s) Habitat
Monitoring
Perceptions
Weed managers
Weeds
Wildlife
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biodiversity Conservation
Environmental Studies
Biodiversity & Conservation
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
UNITED-STATES
RIPARIAN RESTORATION
HIDDEN POPULATIONS
PLANTS
BEHAVIOR
TAMARIX
FRAGMENTATION
BIODIVERSITY
COMMUNITIES
Summary Negative impacts of invasive plants or weeds on biodiversity have been well established yet their role in providing key habitats and resources for wildlife has been little understood. Weed removal thus has the potential to adversely affect wildlife but whether this is considered during weed management is poorly known. To determine the extent of this knowledge, we examined the perceptions of weed managers regarding wildlife and weed management in Victoria, Australia. We surveyed 81 weed managers of varying levels of experience from different types of organisations, including state and local government, community groups and private companies. We found 90% of managers had observed wildlife-weed interactions and that most (70%) adjusted management programmes to accommodate wildlife. Despite this, few (19%) had adopted the recommended practice of combining gradual weed removal with re-vegetation. While management programmes included monitoring of native vegetation, consideration of wildlife monitoring in weed management was rare. This highlights the need for management to better understand and respond to wildlife-weed relationships. If the improvement of wildlife habitat is included in the objectives of weed programmes, as it should be, then wildlife should also be incorporated in project monitoring. This would lead to a greater understanding of the role weeds and their management have in each situation and, ultimately, more informed decision making. Copyright: © Carlos et al. 2014.
Language eng
DOI 10.4103/0972-4923.132131
Field of Research 050205 Environmental Management
Socio Economic Objective 960501 Ecosystem Assessment and Management at Regional or Larger Scales
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067804

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.