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Personal, musical and social benefits of singing in a community ensemble: three case studies in Melbourne (Australia)

Joseph,D and Southcott,J 2014, Personal, musical and social benefits of singing in a community ensemble: three case studies in Melbourne (Australia), The Journal of transdisciplinary research in Southern Africa, vol. 10, no. 2, Special edition: music and well-being, pp. 125-137.

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Title Personal, musical and social benefits of singing in a community ensemble: three case studies in Melbourne (Australia)
Author(s) Joseph,DORCID iD for Joseph,D orcid.org/0000-0002-6320-900X
Southcott,J
Journal name The Journal of transdisciplinary research in Southern Africa
Volume number 10
Issue number 2
Season Special edition: music and well-being
Start page 125
End page 137
Total pages 12
Publisher North-West University
Place of publication Vanderbijlpark, South Africa
Publication date 2014-11-30
ISSN 1817-4434
Keyword(s) music and positive ageing
community singing
cultural identity
well-being
Summary Australia has a diverse, multilayered society that reflects its rich musical life. There are many community choirs formed by various cultural and linguistically diverse groups. This article is part of an ongoing project, Well-being and ageing: community, diversity and the arts (since 2008), undertaken by Deakin University and Monash University, that explores the cultural diversity within Australian society and how active music engagement fosters well-being. The singing groups selected for this discussion are the Skylarkers, the Bosnian Behar Choir, and the Coro Furlan. The Skylarkers and the Bosnian Behar Choir are mixed groups who respectively perform popular music from their generation and celebrate their culture through music. The Coro Furlan is an Italian male choir who understand themselves as custodians of their heritage. In these interpretative, qualitative case studies semi-structured interviews were undertaken and analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. In this approach there is an exploration of participants’ understanding of their lived experiences. The analysis of the combined data identified musical and social benefits that contribute to participants’ sense of individual well-being. Musical benefits occurred through sharing, learning and singing together. Social benefits included opportunities to build friendships, overcome isolation and gain a sense of validation. Many found that singing enhanced their health and happiness. Active music making in community choirs and music ensembles continues to be an effective way to support individuals, build community, and share culture and heritage.
Language eng
Field of Research 130101 Continuing and Community Education
Socio Economic Objective 950101 Music
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, North-West University
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067838

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.