You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

The politics of boganism and public relations in contemporary Australia

Demetrious, Kristin 2014, The politics of boganism and public relations in contemporary Australia, in CPIS 2014 : Proceedings of the Contemporary Publics 2014 International Symposium, Deakin University, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 1-1.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
demetrious-werefull-abstract-2014.pdf Published version application/pdf 635.45KB 13
demetrious-werefull-evid-2014.pdf Evidence application/pdf 1.34MB 102

Title The politics of boganism and public relations in contemporary Australia
Formatted title  'F*** off, we're full' : the politics of boganism and public relations in contemporary Australia
Author(s) Demetrious, Kristin
Conference name Contemporary Publics. International Symposium (2014 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 24 - 25 Feb. 2014
Title of proceedings CPIS 2014 : Proceedings of the Contemporary Publics 2014 International Symposium
Editor(s) Redmond, SeanORCID iD for Redmond, Sean orcid.org/0000-0002-1460-8610
Publication date 2014
Conference series Contemporary Publics International Symposium
Start page 1
End page 1
Total pages 1
Publisher Deakin University
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) boganism
public relations
contemporary Australia
Summary What is meant by the term ‘bogan’ and how does its popular usage distinguish a new public occupying a particular class position and social presence in Australian society. Examining a number of media texts, this paper explores the bogan phenomenon and asks if it normatively repositions Marxist ideas of class within the contemporary construct of lifestyle politics and classless capitalism (Beck). Challenging the idea the term is politically benign, the paper argues that the rise ‘boganism’ and its stigmatic associations has implications for public relations. In particular, it argues successful framing techniques designate a group of people occupying social risk positions and that are dis-empowered by eco-discourses and targeted for social control. These marginalised publics lack the sociocultural resources required for participation in the public sphere and as such are malleable and highly receptive to intrinsic and extrinsic forms of public relations.
Language eng
Field of Research 209999 Language, Communication and Culture not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970120 Expanding Knowledge in Language
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2014, Deakin University
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067845

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 87 Abstract Views, 118 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 09 Dec 2014, 08:52:25 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.