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Efficacy of Cognitive Processes in Young People with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder Using a Novel Visual Information-Processing Task

Speirs,SJ, Rinehart,NJ, Robinson,SR, Tonge,BJ and Yelland,GW 2014, Efficacy of Cognitive Processes in Young People with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder Using a Novel Visual Information-Processing Task, Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, vol. 44, no. 11, pp. 2809-2819, doi: 10.1007/s10803-014-2140-8.

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Title Efficacy of Cognitive Processes in Young People with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder Using a Novel Visual Information-Processing Task
Author(s) Speirs,SJ
Rinehart,NJORCID iD for Rinehart,NJ orcid.org/0000-0001-6109-3958
Robinson,SR
Tonge,BJ
Yelland,GW
Journal name Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume number 44
Issue number 11
Start page 2809
End page 2819
Total pages 11
Publisher Springer New York
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2014-11
ISSN 0162-3257
1573-3432
Keyword(s) Autism spectrum disorder
Cognitive processing
Processing efficacy
Speed of processing
Subtle Cognitive Impairment Test
Summary Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterised by a unique pattern of preserved abilities and deficits within and across cognitive domains. The Complex Information Processing Theory proposes this pattern reflects an altered capacity to respond to cognitive demands. This study compared how complexity induced by time constraints on processing affect cognitive function in individuals with ASD and typically-developing individuals. On a visual information-processing task, the Subtle Cognitive Impairment Test, both groups exhibited sensitivity to time-constraints. Further, 65 % of individuals with ASD demonstrated deficits in processing efficiency, possibly attributable to the effects of age and clinical comorbidities, like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. These findings suggest that for some ASD individuals there are significant impairments in processing efficiency, which may have implications for education and interventions. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media New York.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s10803-014-2140-8
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Springer New York
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067859

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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