Values, attitudes, and frequency of meat consumption: predicting meat-reduced diet in Australians

Hayley, Alexa, Zinkiewicz, Lucy and Hardiman, Kate 2015, Values, attitudes, and frequency of meat consumption: predicting meat-reduced diet in Australians, Appetite, vol. 84, pp. 98-106, doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2014.10.002.

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Title Values, attitudes, and frequency of meat consumption: predicting meat-reduced diet in Australians
Author(s) Hayley, Alexa
Zinkiewicz, LucyORCID iD for Zinkiewicz, Lucy orcid.org/0000-0002-1861-1673
Hardiman, Kate
Journal name Appetite
Volume number 84
Start page 98
End page 106
Total pages 9
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-01
ISSN 1095-8304
Keyword(s) Meat
attitudes
behavior
diet
fish
values
Behaviour
Summary Reduced consumption of meat, particularly red meat, is associated with numerous health benefits. While past research has examined demographic and cognitive correlates of meat-related diet identity and meat consumption behavior, the predictive influence of personal values on meat-consumption attitudes and behaviour, as well as gender differences therein, has not been explicitly examined, nor has past research focusing on 'meat' generally addressed 'white meat' and 'fish/seafood' as distinct categories of interest. Two hundred and two Australians (59.9% female, 39.1% male, 1% unknown), aged 18 to 91 years (M = 31.42, SD = 16.18), completed an online questionnaire including the Schwartz Values Survey, and measures of diet identity, attitude towards reduced consumption of each of red meat, white meat, and fish/seafood, as well as self-reported estimates of frequency of consumption of each meat type. Results showed that higher valuing of Universalism predicted more positive attitudes towards reducing, and less frequent consumption of, each of red meat, white meat, and fish/seafood, while higher Power predicted less positive attitudes towards reducing, and more frequent consumption of, these meats. Higher Security predicted less positive attitudes towards reducing, and more frequent consumption, of white meat and fish/seafood, while Conformity produced this latter effect for fish/seafood only. Despite men valuing Power more highly than women, women valuing Universalism more highly than men, and men eating red meat more frequently than women, gender was not a significant moderator of the value-attitude-behavior mediations described, suggesting that gender's effects on meat consumption may not be robust once entered into a multivariate model of MRD attitudes and behaviour. Results support past findings associating Universalism, Power, and Security values with meat-eating preferences, and extend these findings by articulating how these values relate specifically to different types of meat.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2014.10.002
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067905

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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