Ethics of teaching with social media

Henderson,M, Auld,G and Johnson,NF 2014, Ethics of teaching with social media, in ACEC 2014 : Now it’s personal : Australian Computers in Education 2014 conference, Australian Computers in Education Conference, [Adelaide, S. A.], pp. 1-7.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Ethics of teaching with social media
Author(s) Henderson,M
Auld,GORCID iD for Auld,G orcid.org/0000-0001-7875-2972
Johnson,NF
Conference name Australian Computers in Education. Conference (26th : 2014 : Adelaide, S. A.)
Conference location Adelaide, S. A.
Conference dates 2014/9/30 - 2014/10/3
Title of proceedings ACEC 2014 : Now it’s personal : Australian Computers in Education 2014 conference
Editor(s) Sweeney,T
Urban,S
Publication date 2014
Conference series Australian Computers in Education Conference
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher Australian Computers in Education Conference
Place of publication [Adelaide, S. A.]
Keyword(s) teachers
social media
social networks
ethical dilemmas
Summary This paper goes beyond the commonly held concerns of Internet safety, such as cyberbullying. Instead, it explores the ethical dilemmas we face as teachers when using social media, in particular social networks, in the classroom. We believe old ideas of respect and culture of care for children and young people need to be reconstructed around new media. This paper draws on the authors’ experience in teaching with, and researching students’ use of, social media in the classroom. In this paper we explore the ethical issues of consent, traceability, and public/private boundaries. We tackle the complex issue of the rights around virtual identities of the students followed by a discussion on the ethics of engaging students in public performance of curriculum and their lives. Finally we discuss the ethical dilemma involved in recognising and responding to illicit activity. While we reflect on our own response to these dilemmas and propose a dialogic process as the way forward, we also return to the argument that the e ethical choices are dilemmas in which most, if not all, options are unpalatable or impracticable.
ISBN 0646920952
9780646920955
Language eng
Field of Research 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2014, Australian Computers in Education Conference
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067908

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Education
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 439 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 28 Nov 2014, 10:09:21 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.