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Regional differences in the reproductive parameters of the sparsely-spotted stingaree, Urolophus paucimaculatus, from South-Eastern Australia

Trinnie,FI, Walker,TI, Jones,PL and Laurenson,LJ 2014, Regional differences in the reproductive parameters of the sparsely-spotted stingaree, Urolophus paucimaculatus, from South-Eastern Australia, Marine and Freshwater Research, vol. 65, no. 11, pp. 943-958, doi: 10.1071/MF13275.

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Title Regional differences in the reproductive parameters of the sparsely-spotted stingaree, Urolophus paucimaculatus, from South-Eastern Australia
Author(s) Trinnie,FI
Walker,TI
Jones,PLORCID iD for Jones,PL orcid.org/0000-0002-5028-5775
Laurenson,LJORCID iD for Laurenson,LJ orcid.org/0000-0003-2321-7512
Journal name Marine and Freshwater Research
Volume number 65
Issue number 11
Start page 943
End page 958
Total pages 16
Publisher CSIRO
Place of publication Vic, Australia
Publication date 2014-10-10
ISSN 1323-1650
Keyword(s) batoid
litter size
maternity
maturity
reproduction
Summary Whether spatial variation occurs in the life-history traits of chondrichthyan species is important to fisheries modelling and assessments. A study on the reproductive parameters of Urolophus paucimaculatus from four separate regions across south-eastern Australia found regional differences in maximum total length (TL), size-at-maturity, size-at-maternity and litter sizes. Inshore embayments (Port Phillip Bay (PPB) and Corner Inlet (CI)) appear to allow for larger TLs (females and males) than do offshore areas (Lakes Entrance (LE) and Western Bass Strait (WBS)). Size-at-maturity and size-at-maternity decreased across longitude from west (PPB) to east (LE) and seasonality of parturition and ovulation occurred earlier in PPB (August-October) than in LE (September-December). Maximum litter size correlated with maximum TL (six in PPB, five in each of CI and LE, and four in WBS). There was uncertainty in classifying females for maternal condition because the reproductive cycle appears to range from a continuous annual cycle to a non-continuous biennial cycle. Much of the uncertainty arises from the ambiguity of observation of non-pregnant mature females, which have either aborted through capture and handling, or are in a 'resting year' between pregnancies. Most likely, the majority are reproducing annually with an unknown proportion of females non-continuous and resting between pregnancies.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/MF13275
Field of Research 060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
060303 Biological Adaptation
060308 Life Histories
Socio Economic Objective 960802 Coastal and Estuarine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, CSIRO
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30068011

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