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Translating the gothic tradition: St Patrick's Cathedral Melbourne

de Jong, Ursula 2014, Translating the gothic tradition: St Patrick's Cathedral Melbourne, in Proceedings of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand: 31, Translation, SAHANZ and Unitec ePress, [Auckland, New Zealand], pp. 723-734.

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Title Translating the gothic tradition: St Patrick's Cathedral Melbourne
Author(s) de Jong, UrsulaORCID iD for de Jong, Ursula orcid.org/0000-0002-7686-0619
Conference name Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand. Conference (31st : 2014 : Auckland, New Zealand)
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 2-5 Jul. 2014
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand: 31, Translation
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2014
Conference series Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand Conference
Start page 723
End page 734
Total pages 12
Publisher SAHANZ and Unitec ePress
Place of publication [Auckland, New Zealand]
Summary During the 1850s, England and France were the leading centres of debate over the Gothic Revival. As Barry Bergdoll argues, the issues that loomed large were at once architectural and political: stylistic eclecticism versus national purity, invention versus tradition, nationalism versus cosmopolitanism, as well as the challenge of new building programmes and new materials to the historicist logic of the Gothic Revival position. William Wilkinson Wardell (1823-99), the architect of St Patrick's Cathedral, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (1858-97) found himself in the midst of this debate. ln.,1858, Wardell's client, James Alipius Goold, Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Melbourne, found that local circumstances significantly influenced his aspirations for a new Catholic cathedral for Melbourne. The choices Wardell made eventually gave shape to the Gothic Revival in Australia.The New World perhaps echoing Didron, demanded of the past all it could offer the present and especially the future: a Gothic cathedral was deemed a fitting carrier of the principles, morals, beliefs and spirit of a Christian civilisation. Unlike many of his contemporaries in Britain and Europe, Wardell in Australia was to see his Gothic Cathedrals of St Patrick's and St Mary's substantially realised in his lifetime. This paper presents a building history of Wardell's St Patrick's, Melbourne, and critically examines the translations which are embedded in the design and fabric of this nineteenth-century Gothic revival cathedral.
ISBN 9781927214121
Language eng
Field of Research 120102 Architectural Heritage and Conservation
120103 Architectural History and Theory
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2014, SAHANZ and Unitec ePress
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30068024

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.