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Increasing Iron and Zinc in Pre-Menopausal Women and Its Effects on Mood and Cognition: A Systematic Review.

Lomagno,KA, Hu,F, Riddell,LJ, Booth,AO, Szymlek-Gay,EA, Nowson,CA and Byrne,LK 2014, Increasing Iron and Zinc in Pre-Menopausal Women and Its Effects on Mood and Cognition: A Systematic Review., Nutrients, vol. 6, no. 11, pp. 5117-5141, doi: 10.3390/nu6115117.

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Title Increasing Iron and Zinc in Pre-Menopausal Women and Its Effects on Mood and Cognition: A Systematic Review.
Author(s) Lomagno,KA
Hu,F
Riddell,LJORCID iD for Riddell,LJ orcid.org/0000-0002-0688-2134
Booth,AOORCID iD for Booth,AO orcid.org/0000-0003-4914-7006
Szymlek-Gay,EA
Nowson,CAORCID iD for Nowson,CA orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Byrne,LKORCID iD for Byrne,LK orcid.org/0000-0001-9055-0046
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 6
Issue number 11
Start page 5117
End page 5141
Total pages 25
Publisher Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2014-11-14
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) Cognition
Depression
Iron deficiency
Pre-menopausal women
Zinc deficiency
Summary Iron and zinc are essential minerals often present in similar food sources. In addition to the adverse effects of frank iron and zinc-deficient states, iron insufficiency has been associated with impairments in mood and cognition. This paper reviews current literature on iron or zinc supplementation and its impact on mood or cognition in pre-menopausal women. Searches included MEDLINE complete, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), psychINFO, psychARTICLES, pubMED, ProQuest Health and Medical Complete Academic Search complete, Scopus and ScienceDirect. Ten randomized controlled trials and one non-randomized controlled trial were found to meet the inclusion criteria. Seven studies found improvements in aspects of mood and cognition after iron supplementation. Iron supplementation appeared to improve memory and intellectual ability in participants aged between 12 and 55 years in seven studies, regardless of whether the participant was initially iron insufficient or iron-deficient with anaemia. The review also found three controlled studies providing evidence to suggest a role for zinc supplementation as a treatment for depressive symptoms, as both an adjunct to traditional antidepressant therapy for individuals with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder and as a therapy in its own right in pre-menopausal women with zinc deficiency. Overall, the current literature indicates a positive effect of improving zinc status on enhanced cognitive and emotional functioning. However, further study involving well-designed randomized controlled trials is needed to identify the impact of improving iron and zinc status on mood and cognition.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu6115117
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30068036

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.