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Simplification of arboreal marsupial assemblages in response to increasing urbanization

Isaac, Bronwyn, White, John, Ierodiaconou, Daniel and Cooke, Raylene 2014, Simplification of arboreal marsupial assemblages in response to increasing urbanization, PLoS One, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0091049.

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Title Simplification of arboreal marsupial assemblages in response to increasing urbanization
Author(s) Isaac, Bronwyn
White, JohnORCID iD for White, John orcid.org/0000-0002-7375-5944
Ierodiaconou, DanielORCID iD for Ierodiaconou, Daniel orcid.org/0000-0002-7832-4801
Cooke, RayleneORCID iD for Cooke, Raylene orcid.org/0000-0002-8843-7113
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 9
Issue number 3
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2014-03-07
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
POSSUMS TRICHOSURUS-VULPECULA
OWLS NINOX-STRENUA
HOME-RANGE
BIOTIC HOMOGENIZATION
SPECIES DISTRIBUTION
PETAUROIDES-VOLANS
DEN-USE
URBAN
FOREST
CONSERVATION
Summary Arboreal marsupials play an essential role in ecosystem function including regulating insect and plant populations, facilitating pollen and seed dispersal and acting as a prey source for higher-order carnivores in Australian environments. Primarily, research has focused on their biology, ecology and response to disturbance in forested and urban environments. We used presence-only species distribution modelling to understand the relationship between occurrences of arboreal marsupials and eco-geographical variables, and to infer habitat suitability across an urban gradient. We used post-proportional analysis to determine whether increasing urbanization affected potential habitat for arboreal marsupials. The key eco-geographical variables that influenced disturbance intolerant species and those with moderate tolerance to disturbance were natural features such as tree cover and proximity to rivers and to riparian vegetation, whereas variables for disturbance tolerant species were anthropogenic-based (e.g., road density) but also included some natural characteristics such as proximity to riparian vegetation, elevation and tree cover. Arboreal marsupial diversity was subject to substantial change along the gradient, with potential habitat for disturbance-tolerant marsupials distributed across the complete gradient and potential habitat for less tolerant species being restricted to the natural portion of the gradient. This resulted in highly-urbanized environments being inhabited by a few generalist arboreal marsupial species. Increasing urbanization therefore leads to functional simplification of arboreal marsupial assemblages, thus impacting on the ecosystem services they provide.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0091049
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
Socio Economic Objective 960805 Flora
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Public Library of Science
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30068041

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.