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Camera trapping: a contemporary approach to monitoring invasive rodents in high conservation priority ecosystems

Rendall, Anthony R., Sutherland, Duncan R., Cooke, Raylene and White, John 2014, Camera trapping: a contemporary approach to monitoring invasive rodents in high conservation priority ecosystems, PLoS One, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0086592.

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Title Camera trapping: a contemporary approach to monitoring invasive rodents in high conservation priority ecosystems
Author(s) Rendall, Anthony R.
Sutherland, Duncan R.
Cooke, RayleneORCID iD for Cooke, Raylene orcid.org/0000-0002-8843-7113
White, JohnORCID iD for White, John orcid.org/0000-0002-7375-5944
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 9
Issue number 3
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2014-03
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
RATS RATTUS-RATTUS
PRINCE-EDWARD-ISLANDS
FERAL HOUSE MICE
NEW-ZEALAND
BLACK RATS
POPULATION-DYNAMICS
HABITAT STRUCTURE
INTRODUCED RATS
ANIMAL DENSITY
SEABIRDS
Animals
Australia
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecosystem
Introduced Species
Islands
Mice
Photography
Population Density
Rats
Summary Invasive rodent species have established on 80% of the world's islands causing significant damage to island environments. Insular ecosystems support proportionally more biodiversity than comparative mainland areas, highlighting them as critical for global biodiversity conservation. Few techniques currently exist to adequately detect, with high confidence, species that are trap-adverse such as the black rat, Rattus rattus, in high conservation priority areas where multiple non-target species persist. This study investigates the effectiveness of camera trapping for monitoring invasive rodents in high conservation areas, and the influence of habitat features and density of colonial-nesting seabirds on rodent relative activity levels to provide insights into their potential impacts. A total of 276 camera sites were established and left in situ for 8 days. Identified species were recorded in discrete 15 min intervals, referred to as 'events'. In total, 19 804 events were recorded. From these, 31 species were identified comprising 25 native species and six introduced. Two introduced rodent species were detected: the black rat (90% of sites), and house mouse Mus musculus (56% of sites). Rodent activity of both black rats and house mice were positively associated with the structural density of habitats. Density of seabird burrows was not strongly associated with relative activity levels of rodents, yet rodents were still present in these areas. Camera trapping enabled a large number of rodents to be detected with confidence in site-specific absences and high resolution to quantify relative activity levels. This method enables detection of multiple species simultaneously with low impact (for both target and non-target individuals); an ideal strategy for monitoring trap-adverse invasive rodents in high conservation areas.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0086592
Field of Research 050103 Invasive Species Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 960805 Flora
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30068043

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.