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Conservation covenants on private land : issues with measuring and achieving biodiversity outcomes in Australia

Fitzsimons,JA and Carr,CB 2014, Conservation covenants on private land : issues with measuring and achieving biodiversity outcomes in Australia, Environmental Management, vol. 54, no. 3, pp. 606-616, doi: 10.1007/s00267-014-0329-4.

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Title Conservation covenants on private land : issues with measuring and achieving biodiversity outcomes in Australia
Author(s) Fitzsimons,JAORCID iD for Fitzsimons,JA orcid.org/0000-0003-4277-8040
Carr,CB
Journal name Environmental Management
Volume number 54
Issue number 3
Start page 606
End page 616
Total pages 11
Publisher Springer
Place of publication New York, NY
Publication date 2014-09
ISSN 1432-1009
Keyword(s) Conservation covenants
Conservation outcomes
Monitoring
Private land
Private protected areas
Australia
Biodiversity
Conservation of Natural Resources
Data Collection
Government Agencies
Humans
Public Policy
Summary Conservation covenants and easements have become essential tools to secure biodiversity outcomes on private land, and to assist in meeting international protection targets. In Australia, the number and spatial area of conservation covenants has grown significantly in the past decade. Yet there has been little research or detailed policy analysis of conservation covenanting in Australia. We sought to determine how conservation covenanting agencies were measuring the biodiversity conservation outcomes achieved on covenanted properties, and factors inhibiting or contributing to measuring these outcomes. In addition, we also investigated the drivers and constraints associated with actually delivering the biodiversity outcomes, drawing on detailed input from covenanting programs. Although all conservation covenanting programs had the broad aim of maintaining or improving biodiversity in their covenants in the long term, the specific stated objectives of conservation covenanting programs varied. Programs undertook monitoring and evaluation in different ways and at different spatial and temporal scales. Thus, it was difficult to determine the extent Australian conservation covenanting agencies were measuring the biodiversity conservation outcomes achieved on covenanted properties on a national scale. Lack of time available to covenantors to undertake management was one of the biggest impediments to achieving biodiversity conservation outcomes. A lack of financial resources and human capital to monitor, knowing what to monitor, inconsistent monitoring methodologies, a lack of benchmark data, and length of time to achieve outcomes were all considered potential barriers to monitoring the biodiversity conservation outcomes of conservation covenants.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00267-014-0329-4
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
Socio Economic Objective 960799 Environmental Policy, Legislation and Standards not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30068085

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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