Coupling online control and inhibitory systems in children with developmental coordination disorder: goal-directed reaching

Ruddock, Scott, Piek, Jan, Sugden, David, Morris, Sue, Hyde, Christian, Caeyenberghs, Karen and Wilson, Peter 2015, Coupling online control and inhibitory systems in children with developmental coordination disorder: goal-directed reaching, Research in developmental disabilities, vol. 36, pp. 244-255, doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2014.10.013.

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Title Coupling online control and inhibitory systems in children with developmental coordination disorder: goal-directed reaching
Author(s) Ruddock, Scott
Piek, Jan
Sugden, David
Morris, Sue
Hyde, ChristianORCID iD for Hyde, Christian orcid.org/0000-0003-4833-4782
Caeyenberghs, Karen
Wilson, Peter
Journal name Research in developmental disabilities
Volume number 36
Start page 244
End page 255
Total pages 12
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-01
ISSN 1873-3379
Keyword(s) Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD)
Executive function
Inhibitory control
Motor control
Motor development
Motor learning
Predictive modelling
Summary For children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), the real-time coupling between frontal executive function and online motor control has not been explored despite reported deficits in each domain. The aim of the present study was to investigate how children with DCD enlist online control under task constraints that compel the need for inhibitory control. A total of 129 school children were sampled from mainstream primary schools. Forty-two children who met research criteria for DCD were compared with 87 typically developing controls on a modified double-jump reaching task. Children within each skill group were divided into three age bands: younger (6-7 years), mid-aged (8-9), and older (10-12). Online control was compared between groups as a function of trial type (non-jump, jump, anti-jump). Overall, results showed that while movement times were similar between skill groups under simple task constraints (non-jump), on perturbation (or jump) trials the DCD group were significantly slower than controls and corrected trajectories later. Critically, the DCD group was further disadvantaged by anti-jump trials where inhibitory control was required; however, this effect reduced with age. While coupling online control and executive systems is not well developed in younger and mid-aged children, there is evidence of age-appropriate coupling in older children. Longitudinal data are needed to clarify this intriguing finding. The theoretical and applied implications of these results are discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.ridd.2014.10.013
Field of Research 170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30068200

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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