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Fetal programming of schizophrenia: select mechanisms

Debnath,M, Venkatasubramanian,G and Berk,M 2015, Fetal programming of schizophrenia: select mechanisms, Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews, vol. 49, pp. 90-104, doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2014.12.003.

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Title Fetal programming of schizophrenia: select mechanisms
Author(s) Debnath,M
Venkatasubramanian,G
Berk,MORCID iD for Berk,M orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Journal name Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews
Volume number 49
Start page 90
End page 104
Total pages 15
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-02
ISSN 1873-7528
Keyword(s) Diet
Epigenetics
Fetal programming
Infection
Inflammation
Neurodevelopment
Oxidative stress
Perinatal
Prenatal
Schizophrenia
Stress
Summary Mounting evidence indicates that schizophrenia is associated with adverse intrauterine experiences. An adverse or suboptimal fetal environment can cause irreversible changes in brain that can subsequently exert long-lasting effects through resetting a diverse array of biological systems including endocrine, immune and nervous. It is evident from animal and imaging studies that subtle variations in the intrauterine environment can cause recognizable differences in brain structure and cognitive functions in the offspring. A wide variety of environmental factors may play a role in precipitating the emergent developmental dysregulation and the consequent evolution of psychiatric traits in early adulthood by inducing inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and epigenetic dysregulation. However, the precise mechanisms behind such relationships and the specificity of the risk factors for schizophrenia remain exploratory. Considering the paucity of knowledge on fetal programming of schizophrenia, it is timely to consolidate the recent advances in the field and put forward an integrated overview of the mechanisms associated with fetal origin of schizophrenia.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2014.12.003
Field of Research 110319 Psychiatry (incl Psychotherapy)
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30068823

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
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Created: Tue, 06 Jan 2015, 13:42:44 EST

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