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Higher social distress and lower psycho-social wellbeing:examining the coping capacity and health of people with hearing impairment

Hogan, Anthony, Phillips, Rebecca, Brumby, Susan A., Williams, Warwick and Mercer-Grant, Catherine 2015, Higher social distress and lower psycho-social wellbeing:examining the coping capacity and health of people with hearing impairment, Disability and rehabilitation, vol. 37, no. 22, pp. 2070-2075, doi: 10.3109/09638288.2014.996675.

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Title Higher social distress and lower psycho-social wellbeing:examining the coping capacity and health of people with hearing impairment
Author(s) Hogan, Anthony
Phillips, Rebecca
Brumby, Susan A.ORCID iD for Brumby, Susan A. orcid.org/0000-0001-6332-3374
Williams, Warwick
Mercer-Grant, Catherine
Journal name Disability and rehabilitation
Volume number 37
Issue number 22
Start page 2070
End page 2075
Total pages 6
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1464-5165
0963-8288
Keyword(s) coping
health
hearing
quality of life
wellbeing
Summary Abstract
Purpose: The objectives of this paper are as follows: (1) propose an explanatory model as to how hearing disability may impact on health and (2) examine the model’s utility.
Methods: Data were collected on the psycho-social wellbeing, disability and physical health of farmers (n=56) participating in an intervention to manage the social impacts of hearing disability. Two models were proposed and examined using multiple hierarchical linear regression. Model 1 used self-rated quality of life and model 2 used capacity to manage hearing and listening impairments, as dependent variables.
Results: The analyses found that physical measures of hearing impairment (audiograms) were not correlated with physical or mental health outcomes. However, in model 1, self-confidence and self-rated ability to manage hearing impairment were most closely associated with reduced quality of life (anxiety and diastolic blood pressure were positively associated with quality of life). In model 2, higher anxiety and reduced self-confidence were associated with decreasing ability to successfully manage one’s hearing impairment.
Conclusions: The findings support the explanatory model that stress is higher and wellbeing lower when the fit between the person’s coping capacity and environmental demands is poor.
Language eng
DOI 10.3109/09638288.2014.996675
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920107 Hearing, Vision, Speech and Their Disorders
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Informa UK
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30068867

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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