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Intelligibility and accentedness in conversations amongst international students in Australia

Lochland, Paul William 2011, Intelligibility and accentedness in conversations amongst international students in Australia, in Powerpoint presentation from the 2011 Faculty of Arts & Education Higher Degree by Research Summer School, Deakin University, Geelong, Vic., pp. 1-16.

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Title Intelligibility and accentedness in conversations amongst international students in Australia
Author(s) Lochland, Paul William
Conference name Faculty of Arts & Education Higher Degree by Research. Summer School (2011 : Geelong, Victoria)
Conference location Geelong, Victoria
Conference dates 18-20 Feb. 2011
Title of proceedings Powerpoint presentation from the 2011 Faculty of Arts & Education Higher Degree by Research Summer School
Publication date 2011
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher Deakin University
Place of publication Geelong, Vic.
Summary Despite the prevalence of English conversations being held by Non Native Speakers (NNS), little research has investigated accent, the most salient aspect of pronunciation, in English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) interactions. The aim of this study is to investigate two facets of accentedness: the intelligibility of accented speech for Non-Native Listeners (NNL) and the impact that language attitude has on the judgment of accentedness. While accentedness has been shown to be both independent of intelligibility and extremely salient to Native Listeners (NL) (Derwing 2008; Nelson, 2008), there is a significant gap in our understanding of how accented English speech is judged by NNL (Derwing & Munro 1997; 2009; Munro & Derwing 1995; 1999; 2010; Munro 2007). It is hypothesised that there is a dependency between the intelligibility scores of foreign accented speech and accentedness judgment in ELF contexts. Moreover, it is believed that the judgment of accentedness is influenced by attitudes held by the NNL. The intelligibility of accented speech will be investigated by measuring the accuracy of transcribed audio samples. Judgment of accentedness will be measured using a Likert scale and journal entries. Attitudes towards accentedness will, firstly, be quantified using a survey that rates language attitudes on a Likert scale, followed by a semi-structured interview that will elicit attitudes towards accentedness. The results of this study will have implications for the teaching and learning of pronunciation, listening skills, and curriculum design. Furthermore, the findings may allude to fundamental differences in how NNL and Native Listeners (NL) perceive second language (L2) speech; thus, such inferences may lead to a shift in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) perspectives.
Notes Powerpoint Presentation
Language eng
Field of Research 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category EN.1 Other conference paper
Copyright notice ©2011, The Author
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30068956

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Education
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