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Factors affecting acceptability of an email-based intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption

Kothe,EJ and Mullan,BA 2014, Factors affecting acceptability of an email-based intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption, BMC public health, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-1020.

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Title Factors affecting acceptability of an email-based intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption
Author(s) Kothe,EJORCID iD for Kothe,EJ orcid.org/0000-0003-1210-0554
Mullan,BA
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 14
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 7
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2014-09-30
ISSN 1471-2458
Summary  Background: Fresh Facts is a 30-day email-delivered intervention designed to increase the fruit and vegetable consumption of Australian young adults. This study investigated the extent to which the program was acceptable to members of the target audience and examined the relationships between participant and intervention characteristics, attrition, effectiveness, and acceptability ratings. Methods: Young adults were randomised to two levels of message frequency: high-frequency (n = 102), low-frequency (n = 173). Individuals in the high-frequency group received daily emails while individuals in the low-frequency group received an email every 3 days. Results: Individuals in the high-frequency group were more likely to indicate that they received too many emails than individuals in the low-frequency group. No other differences in acceptability were observed. Baseline beliefs about fruit and vegetables were an important predictor of intervention acceptability. In turn, acceptability was associated with a number of indicators of intervention success, including change in fruit and vegetable consumption. Conclusions: The findings highlight the importance of considering the relationship between these intervention and participant factors and acceptability in intervention design and evaluation. Results support the ongoing use of email-based interventions to target fruit and vegetable consumption within young adults. However, the relationships between beliefs about fruit and vegetable consumption and acceptability suggest that this intervention may be differentially effective depending on individual's existing beliefs about fruit and vegetable consumption. As such, there is a pressing need to consider these factors in future research in order to minimize attrition and maximize intervention effectiveness when interventions are implemented outside of a research context.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-1020
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, BioMed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30068960

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.