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Relationship between lower limb neuromuscular performanceand bone strength in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis

Munukka,M, Waller,B, Multanen,J, Rantalainen,T, Häkkinen,A, Nieminen,MT, Lammentausta,E, Kujala,UM, Paloneva,J, Kautiainen,H, Kiviranta,I and Heinonen,A 2014, Relationship between lower limb neuromuscular performanceand bone strength in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis, Journal of musculoskeletal neuronal interactions, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 418-424.

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Title Relationship between lower limb neuromuscular performanceand bone strength in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis
Author(s) Munukka,M
Waller,B
Multanen,J
Rantalainen,TORCID iD for Rantalainen,T orcid.org/0000-0001-6977-4782
Häkkinen,A
Nieminen,MT
Lammentausta,E
Kujala,UM
Paloneva,J
Kautiainen,H
Kiviranta,I
Heinonen,A
Journal name Journal of musculoskeletal neuronal interactions
Volume number 14
Issue number 4
Start page 418
End page 424
Publisher International Society of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions
Place of publication Nafplion, Greece
Publication date 2014-12-01
ISSN 1108-7161
Keyword(s) Bone Strength
DXA
Neuromuscular Performance
Osteoarthritis
PQCT
Summary Objectives: To investigate whether neuromuscular performance predicts lower limb bone strength in different lower limb sites in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: Neuromuscular performance of 139 volunteer women aged 50-68 with mild knee OA was measured using maximal counter movement jump test, isometric knee flexion and extension force and figure-of-eight-running test. Femoral neck section modulus (Z, mm3) was determined by data obtained from dualenergy X-ray absorptiometry. Data obtained using peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to asses distal tibia compressive (BSId, g2/cm4) and tibial mid-shaft bending (SSImaxmid, mm3) strength indices. Results: After adjustment for height, weight and age, counter movement jump peak power production was the strongest independent predictor for Z (β=0.44; p<0.001) and for BSId (β=0.32; p=0.003). This was also true in concentric net impulse for Z (β=0.37; p=0.001) and for BSId (β=0.40; p<0.001). Additionally, knee extension force (β=0.30; p<0.001) and figure-of-eight-running test (β= -0.32; p<0.001) were among strongest independent predictors for BSId after adjustments. For SSImaxmid, concentric net impulse (β=0.33; p=0.002) remained as the strongest independent predictor after adjustments. Conclusions: Neuromuscular performance in postmenopausal women with mild knee OA predicted lower limb bone strength in every measured skeletal site.
Language eng
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920116 Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, JMNI
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30068965

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.