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Do schools promote social inclusion? The experiences of intercountry adoptees in Australia

Scarvelis,B, Crisp,BR and Goldingay,S 2014, Do schools promote social inclusion? The experiences of intercountry adoptees in Australia, Journal of Social Inclusion, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 61-77.

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Title Do schools promote social inclusion? The experiences of intercountry adoptees in Australia
Author(s) Scarvelis,B
Crisp,BRORCID iD for Crisp,BR orcid.org/0000-0001-7863-4482
Goldingay,SORCID iD for Goldingay,S orcid.org/0000-0002-0776-1086
Journal name Journal of Social Inclusion
Volume number 5
Issue number 1
Start page 61
End page 77
Publisher Griffith University, School of Human Services and Social Work
Place of publication Meadowbrook, QLD
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1836-8808
Keyword(s) school
social inclusion
intercountry adoption
Thailand
racism
educational attainment
Summary Intercountry adoption programs have brought children from racially and culturally diverse backgrounds to live as Australians, including 30 children from Rangsit Children’s Home who arrived in South Australia in the late 1980s and early 1990s. As part of a project which explored the life experiences of 12 adults who had arrived as children aged between 4 and 9 from Rangsit, this paper explores the role of schools in facilitating their inclusion into life in Australia. The school experience was often critical in learning English and was pre-requisite for acceptance in the school yard but also a place in which most of these Thai-born intercountry adoptees experienced racism. More than half of the participants did not complete secondary school but all had employment. However, many of these jobs were low-paying and this precluded them from participating in opportunities to return to Thailand to learn more about their Thai origins or participating as adoptive parents in intercountry adoption programs. Hence, while schools can play an important role in facilitating social inclusion, the school system alone may be unable to address the multiple dimensions of exclusion experienced by intercountry adoptees.
Language eng
Field of Research 160702 Counselling, Welfare and Community Services
Socio Economic Objective 940111 Ethnicity
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Griffith University
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069001

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.