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The role of sweet taste in satiation and satiety

Low, Yu Qing, Lacy, Kathleen and Keast, Russell 2014, The role of sweet taste in satiation and satiety, Nutrients, vol. 6, no. 9, pp. 3431-3450, doi: 10.3390/nu6093431.

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Title The role of sweet taste in satiation and satiety
Author(s) Low, Yu Qing
Lacy, KathleenORCID iD for Lacy, Kathleen orcid.org/0000-0002-2982-4455
Keast, RussellORCID iD for Keast, Russell orcid.org/0000-0003-2147-7687
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 6
Issue number 9
Start page 3431
End page 3450
Total pages 20
Publisher Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2014-09-02
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) Appetite
BMI
Obesity
Oral sensitivity
Oral sweet taste sensitivity
Satiety
Sensory specific satiety
Sugar
Sweet taste
Sweeteners
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Y GASTRIC BYPASS
PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS
HIGH-INTENSITY SWEETENERS
GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE-1
NORMAL-WEIGHT SUBJECTS
SHORT-TERM APPETITE
FOOD-INTAKE
ARTIFICIAL SWEETENER
GLUCOSE-ABSORPTION
ENERGY-INTAKE
Summary Increased energy consumption, especially increased consumption of sweet energy-dense food, is thought to be one of the main contributors to the escalating rates in overweight individuals and obesity globally. The individual's ability to detect or sense sweetness in the oral cavity is thought to be one of many factors influencing food acceptance, and therefore, taste may play an essential role in modulating food acceptance and/or energy intake. Emerging evidence now suggests that the sweet taste signaling mechanisms identified in the oral cavity also operate in the gastrointestinal system and may influence the development of satiety. Understanding the individual differences in detecting sweetness in both the oral and gastrointestinal system towards both caloric sugar and high intensity sweetener and the functional role of the sweet taste system may be important in understanding the reasons for excess energy intake. This review will summarize evidence of possible associations between the sweet taste mechanisms within the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract and the brain systems towards both caloric sugar and high intensity sweetener and sweet taste function, which may influence satiation, satiety and, perhaps, predisposition to being overweight and obesity.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu6093431
Field of Research 090899 Food Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069039

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.