You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

An overview of methods for simulating and evaluating pipeline corrosion

Gupta,RK, Tan,MY, Forsyth,M and Hinton,BRW 2013, An overview of methods for simulating and evaluating pipeline corrosion, in Corrosion and Prevention 2013 : Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australasian Corrosion Association, Australasian Corrosion Association, [Brisbane, Qld.], pp. 513-521.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
gupta-anoverviewofmethods-2013.pdf Published version application/pdf 638.33KB 664

Title An overview of methods for simulating and evaluating pipeline corrosion
Author(s) Gupta,RK
Tan,MYORCID iD for Tan,MY orcid.org/0000-0002-0765-108X
Forsyth,MORCID iD for Forsyth,M orcid.org/0000-0002-4273-8105
Hinton,BRW
Conference name Australasian Corrosion Association. Conference (2013 : Brisbane, Queensland)
Conference location Brisbane, Queensland
Conference dates 10-13 Nov. 2013
Title of proceedings Corrosion and Prevention 2013 : Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australasian Corrosion Association
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2013
Conference series Australasian Corrosion Association Conference
Start page 513
End page 521
Total pages 9
Publisher Australasian Corrosion Association
Place of publication [Brisbane, Qld.]
Keyword(s) Cathodic disbondment
Cathodic protection
Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
Pipeline corrosion
Stray current
Summary Steel pipelines, buried under the soil and protected by the combination of protective coatings and cathodic protection (CP), are used for oil and gas transportation. These pipelines are one of the critical infrastructures for energy transportation and therefore became lifelines of modern society. The deterioration of the external surfaces of transmission pipelines is a serious problem and is caused mainly by coating and/or CP failure leading to the loss of integrity of pipelines. To avoid such damage, there is a need of techniques which are able to locate active corrosion sites, monitor corrosion, and evaluate corrosion damage. Fundamental understanding of such processes occurring on coated pipelines (with various types of defects in coatings as well as pipe) in complex soil environment is necessary for the development of such techniques. Numerous laboratory techniques, i.e., electrochemical impedance spectroscopy based, polarisation measurements based, mathematical simulations, direct observation etc. have been used to develop fundamental understanding, simulate and evaluate corrosion occurring in oil and gas pipelines under various operating conditions. Given the complex nature of the pipeline corrosion, application of these laboratory techniques in field measurements as well as in understanding the corrosion mechanisms is lacking. This paper presents an overview of investigations, based on electrochemical techniques, for simulation and evaluation of pipeline corrosion in laboratory.
ISBN 9781634394369
Language eng
Field of Research 030604 Electrochemistry
091207 Metals and Alloy Materials
Socio Economic Objective 870302 Metals (e.g. Composites, Coatings, Bonding)
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2013, Australasian Corrosion Association
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069099

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 203 Abstract Views, 653 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Sun, 18 Jan 2015, 19:18:08 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.