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Task-specific effects of modular body armor.

Larsen,B, Netto,K and Aisbett,B 2014, Task-specific effects of modular body armor., Military Medicine, vol. 179, no. 4, pp. 428-434, doi: 10.7205/MILMED-D-13-00318.

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Title Task-specific effects of modular body armor.
Author(s) Larsen,B
Netto,K
Aisbett,BORCID iD for Aisbett,B orcid.org/0000-0001-8077-0272
Journal name Military Medicine
Volume number 179
Issue number 4
Start page 428
End page 434
Total pages 8
Publisher Association of Military Surgeons of the U S
Place of publication Bethesda, Md, United States
Publication date 2014-04
ISSN 1930-613X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
OPERATION-ENDURING-FREEDOM
IRAQI-FREEDOM
EXERCISE PERFORMANCE
PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE
COMBAT CASUALTIES
HEAT-STRESS
INTENSITY
Summary Eleven recreationally active males performed 11 circuits of military work, wearing torso armor on one occasion, and full armor on another. Performance was measured by the time taken to complete individual tasks, and the overall time to completion (TTC) for each circuit. Heart rate, intestinal temperature, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and thermal sensation were recorded after each circuit. Participants' circuit TTC was no different between conditions; however, specific tasks were differentially impeded by the two armor configurations. Vaulting and crawling were significantly slower (0.28 ± 0.06 and 0.55 ± 0.26 seconds) in full armor; however, box lifting and shooting were significantly slower (0.36 ± 0.18 and 0.86 ± 0.23 seconds) when wearing torso armor. Heart rate and core temperature were significantly higher during the full armor trial (5 ± 1 beats · min(-1) and 0.22 ± 0.03 °C). Similarly, RPE and thermal sensation were significantly higher (1 ± 0 and 0.5 ± 0.0) during the full armor condition. Military tasks were differentially impaired by the armor configurations used, which suggests a need to explore role-specific armor for military personnel. Physiological and perceptual responses were elevated in full armor, which could be exacerbated during longer periods of work or in hot conditions.
Language eng
DOI 10.7205/MILMED-D-13-00318
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920409 Injury Control
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Association of Military Surgeons of the U S
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069192

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.