You are not logged in.

Does the walkability of neighbourhoods affect children's independent mobility, independent of parental, socio-cultural and individual factors?

Villanueva, Karen, Giles-Corti, Billie, Bulsara, Max, Trapp, Georgina, Timperio, Anna, McCormack, Gavin and Van Niel, Kimberly 2014, Does the walkability of neighbourhoods affect children's independent mobility, independent of parental, socio-cultural and individual factors?, Children's geographies, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 393-411, doi: 10.1080/14733285.2013.812311.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Does the walkability of neighbourhoods affect children's independent mobility, independent of parental, socio-cultural and individual factors?
Author(s) Villanueva, Karen
Giles-Corti, Billie
Bulsara, Max
Trapp, Georgina
Timperio, Anna
McCormack, Gavin
Van Niel, Kimberly
Journal name Children's geographies
Volume number 12
Issue number 4
Start page 393
End page 411
Total pages 19
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2014-01
ISSN 1473-3285
1473-3277
Keyword(s) Australia
built environment
children
independent mobility
walkability
Social Sciences
Geography
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
ELEMENTARY-SCHOOL
ACTIVE TRAVEL
URBAN FORM
AUSTRALIAN CHILDREN
SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR
ADOLESCENT GIRLS
FUTURE-RESEARCH
PEACH PROJECT
Summary The association between neighbourhood walkability and children's independent mobility using an ecological approach is relatively unexplored. In 2007, 1480 10- to 12-year-old children (and 1314 parents) attending low and high walkable schools across Perth, Western Australia, completed surveys. Objective built environment, social-cultural and individual-level factors were explored. High neighbourhood walkability predicted girls' independent mobility. However, girls and boys were more likely to be independently mobile if they and their parents were confident that they could travel independently. Providing safe, walkable neighbourhoods – particularly for girls – combined with strategies to improve children's skills to safely navigate their neighbourhood may increase independent mobility.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/14733285.2013.812311
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
1604 Human Geography
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Taylor & Francis.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069250

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 10 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 02 Mar 2015, 10:31:47 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.