You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Understanding career aspirations of Information Technology students at Deakin University

McKenzie, Sophie, Coldwell-Neilson, Jo, Palmer, Stuart and Coleman, Kathryn 2014, Understanding career aspirations of Information Technology students at Deakin University, in TALE 2014 : Learning for the future now : Proceedings of the 2014 IEEE International Conference on Teaching, Assessment and Learning for Engineering, IEEE, Piscataway, N.J., pp. 301-305, doi: 10.1109/TALE.2014.7062553.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
mckenzie-understandingcareer-post-2014.pdf Authors' post print application/pdf 341.85KB 75

Title Understanding career aspirations of Information Technology students at Deakin University
Author(s) McKenzie, SophieORCID iD for McKenzie, Sophie orcid.org/0000-0001-5803-640X
Coldwell-Neilson, JoORCID iD for Coldwell-Neilson, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-3602-8334
Palmer, StuartORCID iD for Palmer, Stuart orcid.org/0000-0002-2517-0597
Coleman, Kathryn
Conference name Teaching, Assessment and Learning for Engineering. Conference (2014 : Wellington, New Zealand)
Conference location Wellington, New Zealand
Conference dates 8 - 10 Dec. 2014
Title of proceedings TALE 2014 : Learning for the future now : Proceedings of the 2014 IEEE International Conference on Teaching, Assessment and Learning for Engineering
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2014
Conference series Teaching, Assessment and Learning for Engineering Conference
Start page 301
End page 305
Total pages 5
Publisher IEEE
Place of publication Piscataway, N.J.
Keyword(s) Information Technology
Careers
Portfolios
Summary Students need to develop informed and realistic career aspirations to gain the most from their university studies towards their initial career development. However developing their aspirations, goals, and expectations is a complex process. In Information Technology (IT) no clear career development framework is evident in the literature. We present a pilot study which investigates the career aspirations of novice students studying IT at an Australian University. Through a series of career activities their aspirations were explored with the aim of improving support for career development. Results indicate that students have no clear short- or long- term aspirations, yet believe that programming skills are key to achieve a career in IT.
ISBN 9781479976720
Language eng
DOI 10.1109/TALE.2014.7062553
Field of Research 080504 Ubiquitous Computing
Socio Economic Objective 930103 Learner Development
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2014, IEEE
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069270

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 552 Abstract Views, 79 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 25 Mar 2015, 15:06:32 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.