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Street art : Mirror reflections on and meshing with urban agriculture

Mc Culloch,AM 2014, Street art : Mirror reflections on and meshing with urban agricultureWhy we need small cows : Ways to design for Urban Agriculture, VHL University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands, pp.231-246.

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Title Street art : Mirror reflections on and meshing with urban agriculture
Author(s) Mc Culloch,AM
Title of book Why we need small cows : Ways to design for Urban Agriculture
Publication date 2014
Chapter number 11
Total chapters 16
Start page 231
End page 246
Total pages 15
Publisher VHL University of Applied Sciences
Place of Publication Netherlands
Summary Street Art: Mirror Reflections on urban AgricultureThis chapter will look at the way socio-political commentary exists in street art and how it has tended in recent times to be displayed overlooking community urban gardens. The urgency with which inner suburban councils in Melbourne Australia have dedicated themselves to carving out recreational spaces is a reflection on the expectations of multi-cultural groups whose culture incorporates the growth of vegetable and fruits close to their place of residence. Street art, famous for its commentary on urban ugliness, has integrated its philosophy and aesthetics, along side notable community gardens in Melbourne. The images incorporate the aims of urban agriculture whilst often simultaneously critiquing the alienation of the urban dweller cut so relentlessly from the means of growing food and from accessing land that might produce it. Community gardens in the twenty-first century go some way to reversing a state of being in which ‘workers’ were alienated from the source of their labor and their survival. This chapter will also probe the extent to which street art in the inner laneways of Melbourne incorporate in to their designs fauna and flora. This reference to all that is organic in environments devoid of vegetation draws attention not only to that absence but also for the need to address it. This work will therefore deal with two interrelating themes: 1. Street art that complements community gardens; 2. Street art that engages with agricultural imagery and images of fauna and flora with the aim of subverting the continual growth of unregulated concrete jungles. The chapter will be informed by interviews with well known Australian street artists and will also explore the work they have done in Paris, Jamaica, London and Miami on both themes stipulated above.
ISBN 9789082245110
Language eng
Field of Research 190199 Art Theory and Criticism not elsewhere classified
199999 Studies In Creative Arts and Writing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970119 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of the Creative Arts and Writing
HERDC Research category B2 Book chapter in non-commercially published book
Copyright notice ©2014, VHL University of Applied Sciences
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069382

Document type: Book Chapter
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.