You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in a random sample from the Australian population

Moore,E, Pasco,J, Mander,A, Sanders,K, Carne,R, Jenkins,N, Black,M, Schneider,H, Ames,D and Watters,D 2014, The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in a random sample from the Australian population, Journal of investigational biochemistry, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 95-100, doi: 10.5455/jib.20140716041521.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
carne-prevalenceofvitamin-2014.pdf Published version application/pdf 565.07KB 164

Title The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in a random sample from the Australian population
Author(s) Moore,E
Pasco,JORCID iD for Pasco,J orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Mander,A
Sanders,K
Carne,R
Jenkins,N
Black,M
Schneider,H
Ames,D
Watters,D
Journal name Journal of investigational biochemistry
Volume number 3
Issue number 3
Start page 95
End page 100
Publisher American Society for Clinical Investigation
Place of publication Ann Arbor, MI
Publication date 2014
ISSN 2146-8338
2325-4556
Summary  Objective: Vitamin B12 deficiency is common in older adults, and may increase the risk of cognitive impairment. The distribution of vitamin B12 insufficiency in younger age groups is less studied. This study aims to assess the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency (<156ρmol/L) and subclinical low-normal levels (156-250ρmol/L) in a large, random sample of the Australian population across the adult life span.
Methods: We examined serum vitamin B12 levels in a random sample of 1,085 men and 1,125 women aged 20-97 years between 1994 and 2006; in the Barwon Statistical Division, a regional area in south eastern Australia that is representative of the socioeconomic status of the Australian population.
Results: The age-standardised prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in this cohort of men and women was 3.6%. Subclinical low-normal vitamin B12 levels (156-250ρmol/L) were found in 26%. Serum vitamin B12 levels declined with age among men (p-value <0.001) and were lower in men than women (p-value <0.001). Vitamin B12 levels were higher among supplement users (8.0% of the cohort).
Conclusions: Vitamin B12 levels decline with age, and have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive decline. Early intervention by diet education or supplement use to address this age-associated decline in vitamin levels may be an effective strategy to prevent decline in a significant segment of the population. Such intervention may need to start in mid-life (from 50-years of age) before the onset age-related decline in vitamin B12 levels.
Language eng
DOI 10.5455/jib.20140716041521
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, American Society for Clinical Investigation
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069528

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 457 Abstract Views, 165 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 10 Feb 2015, 09:25:28 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.