Evaluating health services with point of service feedback: perspectives and experiences of patients, staff and community volunteers in an inpatient rehabilitation facility

Gill, Stephen D., Dolley, Pamela J., Dunning, Trisha L. and Hughes, Andrew J. 2015, Evaluating health services with point of service feedback: perspectives and experiences of patients, staff and community volunteers in an inpatient rehabilitation facility, Disability and rehabilitation, vol. 37, no. 21, pp. 1997-2005, doi: 10.3109/09638288.2014.996298.

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Title Evaluating health services with point of service feedback: perspectives and experiences of patients, staff and community volunteers in an inpatient rehabilitation facility
Author(s) Gill, Stephen D.
Dolley, Pamela J.
Dunning, Trisha L.ORCID iD for Dunning, Trisha L. orcid.org/0000-0002-0284-1706
Hughes, Andrew J.
Journal name Disability and rehabilitation
Volume number 37
Issue number 21
Start page 1997
End page 2005
Total pages 9
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 0963-8288
1464-5165
Summary PURPOSE: To determine patient, staff and community volunteer opinions and experiences of point of service feedback (POSF) in an inpatient rehabilitation facility. METHOD: Participants were recruited by purposeful sampling. Two researchers conducted in-depth semi-scripted interviews with patients, staff or volunteers until no new issues emerged. Manually transcribed interview data underwent thematic analysis that grouped information into categories of related information. RESULTS: Twenty patients, 26 staff from 10 different professional groups, and 2 community volunteers were interviewed. Patient and volunteer data were grouped into five main categories: patients wanted their voice heard and acted on; patients could be positively and negatively affected by POSF; patients could be reluctant to evaluate staff; patients preferred POSF to post-discharge mailed questionnaires; and patients' feedback was influenced by the data collector. Staff wanted: feedback to help them improve the patient experience; and feedback that was trustworthy, usable and used. Staff believed that the feedback-collector influenced patients' feedback and affected how feedback could be used. CONCLUSIONS: Patients, staff and community volunteers identified issues that determine the appropriateness and usefulness of POSF. Policy and practise should address the preferences, needs and experiences of health service users and providers so that POSF produces maximum benefits for both patients and health services. Implications for Rehabilitation POSF can enhance patients' experiences of inpatient rehabilitation by providing a mechanism to be heard and communicating that patients are valued; care must be exercised with patients who find giving feedback stressful. Collecting POSF is most beneficial when coupled with methods to efficiently and effectively respond to feedback. POSF requires interpretation in light of its limitations including patients' ability to accurately and unreservedly communicate their experiences. Who collects POSF requires careful consideration; community volunteers have both advantages and disadvantages.
Language eng
DOI 10.3109/09638288.2014.996298
Field of Research 110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl Physiotherapy)
Socio Economic Objective 920201 Allied Health Therapies (excl. Mental Health Services)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Informa Healthcare
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069579

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