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Fishy business : effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and free zinc availability in human neuronal cells

De Mel, Damitha and Suphioglu, Cenk 2014, Fishy business : effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and free zinc availability in human neuronal cells, Nutrients, vol. 6, no. 8, pp. 3245-3258, doi: 10.3390/nu6083245.

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Title Fishy business : effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and free zinc availability in human neuronal cells
Author(s) De Mel, Damitha
Suphioglu, CenkORCID iD for Suphioglu, Cenk orcid.org/0000-0003-0101-0668
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 6
Issue number 8
Start page 3245
End page 3258
Total pages 14
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2014-08
ISSN 2072-6643
Summary Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are α-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Central nervous tissues of vertebrates are characterized by a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. DHA deficiency may be the cause of many disorders such as depression, inability to concentrate, excessive mood swings, anxiety, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dry skin and so on. On the other hand, zinc is the most abundant trace metal in the human brain. There are many scientific studies linking zinc, especially excess amounts of free zinc, to cellular death. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, are characterized by altered zinc metabolism. Both animal model studies and human cell culture studies have shown a possible link between omega-3 fatty acids, zinc transporter levels and free zinc availability at cellular levels. Many other studies have also suggested a possible omega-3 and zinc effect on neurodegeneration and cellular death. Therefore, in this review, we will examine the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and the importance of free zinc for human neuronal cells. Moreover, we will evaluate the collective understanding of mechanism(s) for the interaction of these elements in neuronal research and their significance for the diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu6083245
Field of Research 060105 Cell Neurochemistry
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069670

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.