The influence of stocking rate and mixed grazing of Angora goats and Merino sheep on animal and pasture production in southern Australia. 4. Gastrointestinal parasitism

McGregor,BA, Presidente,PJA and Campbell,NJ 2014, The influence of stocking rate and mixed grazing of Angora goats and Merino sheep on animal and pasture production in southern Australia. 4. Gastrointestinal parasitism, Animal production science, vol. 54, no. 5, pp. 587-597, doi: 10.1071/AN13108.

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Title The influence of stocking rate and mixed grazing of Angora goats and Merino sheep on animal and pasture production in southern Australia. 4. Gastrointestinal parasitism
Author(s) McGregor,BAORCID iD for McGregor,BA orcid.org/0000-0002-4574-4236
Presidente,PJA
Campbell,NJ
Journal name Animal production science
Volume number 54
Issue number 5
Start page 587
End page 597
Total pages 11
Publisher CSIRO
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1836-0939
1836-5787
Keyword(s) competitive effects
complementary effects
nematodes
seasonal effects
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Agriculture, Multidisciplinary
Agriculture
BODY CONDITION SCORE
ANTHELMINTIC RESISTANCE
TRICHOSTRONGYLUS-COLUBRIFORMIS
NEMATODE INFECTIONS
WORM BURDENS
DAIRY GOATS
MORTALITY
RESPONSES
EFFICACY
LARVAE
Summary Gastrointestinal nematodes limit the growth, production and welfare of goats but there are few reliable sources of information for recommending management practices across flocks. The effects of animal species (Angora goat, Merino sheep, mixed-grazed goats and mixed-grazed sheep at the ratio of 1:1) and stocking rate (SR: 7.5, 10, 12.5 animals/ha) on gastrointestinal parasitism were determined in a replicated experiment on improved annual temperate pastures in southern Australia, from 1981 to 1984. Detailed monitoring of gastrointestinal nematodes was undertaken on animals before, during (five times per year) and at the conclusion of studies using faecal strongyle egg counts (WEC) and total worm counts. Sheep had a greater proportion of nematodes as Teladorsagia spp. and goats a greater incidence of Trichostrongylus spp. Both goats and sheep developed resistance to Nematodirus spp. during the experiment. WEC was similar in goats and sheep at the start of the experimental period but, thereafter, was consistently greater in goats than in sheep. While WEC was highly related to total worm count, the regressions for sheep and goats were different. Increasing the SR increased the WEC of goats and mixed-grazed goats but not of sheep. During the experiment, WEC declined at 7 and 10 animals/ha but increased at 12.5/ha. Mixed grazing with goats provided beneficial effects for sheep at all stocking rates, but the effects for goats were dependent on the stocking rate, being beneficial at 7.5 and 10/ha but harmful at 12.5/ha. The WEC of separately grazed goats were generally higher than the WEC of mixed grazed goats. The WEC of mixed sheep were lower than those of separately grazed sheep. During the experiment, the WEC of mixed grazed sheep declined faster than the WEC of separately grazed sheep but the WEC of separately grazed goats at 12.5/ha and of mixed grazed goats at 10 and 12.5/ha increased. Under the environmental and pastoral conditions examined, Angora wether goats should not be grazed at SR above those recommended for wether sheep. In the present study, the impact of gastrointestinal-nematode infections in goats was reduced at lower SR. Further, mixed grazing of Angora wether goats with wether sheep at or below the recommended SR resulted in reduced gastrointestinal parasitism for both sheep and goats, compared with monospecific grazing conditions. Goats did not represent a gastrointestinal-nematode hazard to sheep. © 2014 CSIRO.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/AN13108
Field of Research 070204 Animal Nutrition
070203 Animal Management
070708 Veterinary Parasitology
Socio Economic Objective 830304 Goats
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, CSIRO Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069694

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Institute for Frontier Materials
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