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Australian adults’ knowledge of Australian agriculture

Worsley,A, Wang,W and Ridley,S 2015, Australian adults’ knowledge of Australian agriculture, British food journal, vol. 117, no. 1, pp. 400-411, doi: 10.1108/BFJ-07-2013-0175.

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Title Australian adults’ knowledge of Australian agriculture
Author(s) Worsley,AORCID iD for Worsley,A orcid.org/0000-0002-4635-6059
Wang,WORCID iD for Wang,W orcid.org/0000-0003-4287-1704
Ridley,SORCID iD for Ridley,S orcid.org/0000-0002-7112-142X
Journal name British food journal
Volume number 117
Issue number 1
Start page 400
End page 411
Total pages 12
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Place of publication Bingley, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 0007-070X
Keyword(s) Agriculture
Demographics
Survey
Summary Purpose – Agriculture is a major generator of wealth and employment in Australia. However, it faces a range of economic and environmental challenges which require substantial community support. The purpose of this paper is to examine Australian adults’ Australian knowledge of, and attitudes towards, Australian agriculture. Design/methodology/approach – Online questionnaire survey of 1,026 adults conducted nationwide during August 2012. Findings – Most respondents had little knowledge of even the basic aspects of the industry but they approved of farmers’ performance of their roles. Latent class analysis showed that there are two groups of consumers with low and lower levels of knowledge. The respondents’ age, rural residence and universalist values were positive predictors of agricultural knowledge. Research limitations/implications – This was a cross-sectional, quota-based survey which examined only some aspects of agriculture. However, the findings suggest that more communication with the general public about the industry is required in order to build on the positive sentiment that exists within the community. Practical implications – More education about agriculture in schools and higher education is indicated. Social implications – The poor state of knowledge of agriculture threatens the social contract upon which agricultural communities depend for survival. Originality/value – The study highlights the poor state of general knowledge about agriculture in Australia. The findings could be used as a baseline against which the efficacy of future education programmes could be assessed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/BFJ-07-2013-0175
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Emerald
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069774

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.