Openly accessible

Caffeine increases sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in a free-living population: a randomised controlled trial

Keast, Russell S., Swinburn, Boyd A., Sayompark, Dhoungsiri, Whitelock, Susie and Riddell, Lynette J. 2015, Caffeine increases sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in a free-living population: a randomised controlled trial, British journal of nutrition, vol. 113, no. 2, pp. 366-371, doi: 10.1017/S000711451400378X.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
keast-caffeineincreases-2015.pdf Published version application/pdf 3.18MB 44

Title Caffeine increases sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in a free-living population: a randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Keast, Russell S.ORCID iD for Keast, Russell S. orcid.org/0000-0003-2147-7687
Swinburn, Boyd A.
Sayompark, Dhoungsiri
Whitelock, Susie
Riddell, Lynette J.ORCID iD for Riddell, Lynette J. orcid.org/0000-0002-0688-2134
Journal name British journal of nutrition
Volume number 113
Issue number 2
Start page 366
End page 371
Total pages 6
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2015-01
ISSN 1475-2662
Keyword(s) Caffeine
Free-living populations
Sugar-sweetened beverages
Summary Excessive sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption has been associated with overweight and obesity. Caffeine is a common additive to SSB, and through dependence effects, it has the potential to promote the consumption of caffeine-containing foods. The objective of the present study was to assess the influence that caffeine has on the consumption of SSB. Participants (n 99) were blindly assigned to either a caffeinated SSB (C-SSB) or a non-caffeinated SSB (NC-SSB) group. Following randomisation, all participants completed a 9 d flavour-conditioning paradigm. They then completed a 28 d ad libitum intake intervention where they consumed as much or as little of C-SSB or NC-SSB as desired. The amount consumed (ml) was recorded daily, 4 d diet diaries were collected and liking of SSB was assessed at the start and end of the intervention. Participants (n 50) consuming the C-SSB had a daily SSB intake of 419 (sd 298) ml (785 (sd 559) kJ/d) over the 28 d intervention, significantly more than participants (n 49) consuming the NC-SSB (273 (sd 278) ml/d, 512 (sd 521) kJ/d) (P< 0·001). A trained flavour panel (n 30) found no difference in flavour between the C-SSB and NC-SSB (P>0·05). However, participants who consumed the C-SSB liked the SSB more than those who consumed the NC-SSB (6·3 v. 6·0 on a nine-point hedonic scale, P= 0·022). The addition of low concentrations of caffeine to the SSB significantly increases the consumption of the SSB. Regulating caffeine as a food additive may be an effective strategy to decrease the consumption of nutrient-poor high-energy foods and beverages.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S000711451400378X
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069807

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 16 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 468 Abstract Views, 47 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 18 Feb 2015, 10:31:37 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.