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Micronutrient supplement use and diet quality in university students

Wiltgren, Adam R., Booth, Alison O., Kaur, Gunveen, Cicerale, Sara, Lacy, Kathleen E., Thorpe, Maree G., Keast, Russell S. and Riddell, Lynn J. 2015, Micronutrient supplement use and diet quality in university students, Nutrients, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 1094-1107, doi: 10.3390/nu7021094.

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Title Micronutrient supplement use and diet quality in university students
Author(s) Wiltgren, Adam R.
Booth, Alison O.ORCID iD for Booth, Alison O. orcid.org/0000-0003-4914-7006
Kaur, GunveenORCID iD for Kaur, Gunveen orcid.org/0000-0002-6250-0495
Cicerale, SaraORCID iD for Cicerale, Sara orcid.org/0000-0002-1100-0423
Lacy, Kathleen E.ORCID iD for Lacy, Kathleen E. orcid.org/0000-0002-2982-4455
Thorpe, Maree G.
Keast, Russell S.ORCID iD for Keast, Russell S. orcid.org/0000-0003-2147-7687
Riddell, Lynn J.ORCID iD for Riddell, Lynn J. orcid.org/0000-0002-0688-2134
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 7
Issue number 2
Start page 1094
End page 1107
Total pages 14
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2015
ISSN 2072-6643
Summary Many national and international public health organisations recommend achieving nutrient adequacy through consumption of a wide variety of nutritious foods. Despite this, dietary supplement sales continue to increase. Understanding the characteristics of micronutrient supplement users and the relationship with diet quality can help develop effective public health interventions to reduce unnecessary consumption of vitamin and mineral supplements. Participants (n = 1306) were a convenience sample of students studying first year food and nutrition. Data was collected via a Food and Diet Questionnaire (FDQ) and a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). Supplement users were defined as participants who indicated consuming any listed supplement as frequently as once a month or more. Diet quality was assessed using a Dietary Guideline Index (DGI) score. Prevalence of supplement use was high in this study population with 56% of participants reporting supplement use; the most popular supplements consumed were multivitamins (28%) and vitamin C (28%). A higher DGI score was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of supplement use (mean: 105 ± 18 vs. 109 ± 17, p = 0.001). Micronutrient supplement use was associated with a higher DGI score, suggesting that supplements are more likely to be used by those who are less likely to require them.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu7021094
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, MDPI
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069809

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.