All signals are not equal: acoustic signalling of individuality, sex and breeding status in a cooperative breeder

Warrington,MH, McDonald,PG, Rollins,LA and Griffith,SC 2014, All signals are not equal: acoustic signalling of individuality, sex and breeding status in a cooperative breeder, Animal behaviour, vol. 93, pp. 249-260, doi: 10.1016/j.anbehav.2014.05.007.

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Title All signals are not equal: acoustic signalling of individuality, sex and breeding status in a cooperative breeder
Author(s) Warrington,MH
McDonald,PG
Rollins,LAORCID iD for Rollins,LA orcid.org/0000-0002-3279-7005
Griffith,SC
Journal name Animal behaviour
Volume number 93
Start page 249
End page 260
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2014-07
ISSN 0003-3472
Keyword(s) Apostlebird
Call signatures
Cooperation
Group living
Individually distinct calls
Relatedness
Sociality
SPCC
Vocalizations
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Behavioral Sciences
Zoology
MEERKAT ALARM CALLS
KIN RECOGNITION
COMMUNICATIVE COMPLEXITY
STRUTHIDEA-CINEREA
PROVISIONING CALLS
GENETIC DISTANCE
ZEBRA FINCH
SOCIAL BIRD
INFORMATION
SONGBIRD
Summary Repeated interactions between individuals in socially living animals select for the evolution of signals that convey information identifying individuals or categories of individuals, which may enable the discrimination of familiar versus unfamiliar individuals. Such information may help animals maximize their inclusive fitness by adjusting their own behaviour, allowing them to avoid conflict, preferentially direct help and/or ignore unreliable individuals. Acoustic signals in birds provide the potential to encode individual-specific information. We examined the degree to which individual identity, sex, breeding status, group membership and genetic relatedness were related to variability in six different call types, which occurred across a variety of different behavioural contexts in the apostlebird, Struthidea cinerea, a socially living and cooperatively breeding Australian passerine. We demonstrated that not all calls reflected the same extent of information. Of the six call types, call variation was related to individual identity in three call types, breeding status in two call types and sex and group relatedness in one call type. Finally, variation in two call types was not related to any of the measured variables. Our results suggest that some, but not all, acoustic signals in apostlebirds may be selected for individual distinctiveness between individuals and categories of individuals (male versus female, breeder versus nonbreeder), and these signals may be important in determining levels of cooperation and interaction between individuals in this cooperatively breeding society. © 2014 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.anbehav.2014.05.007
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069845

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