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International perspectives on psychosocial working conditions, mental health, and stress of dairy farm operators

Lunner Kolstrup,C, Kallioniemi,M, Lundqvist,P, Kymäläinen,HR, Stallones,L and Brumby,S 2013, International perspectives on psychosocial working conditions, mental health, and stress of dairy farm operators, Journal of agromedicine, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 244-255, doi: 10.1080/1059924X.2013.796903.

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Title International perspectives on psychosocial working conditions, mental health, and stress of dairy farm operators
Author(s) Lunner Kolstrup,C
Kallioniemi,M
Lundqvist,P
Kymäläinen,HR
Stallones,L
Brumby,SORCID iD for Brumby,S orcid.org/0000-0001-6332-3374
Journal name Journal of agromedicine
Volume number 18
Issue number 3
Start page 244
End page 255
Total pages 12
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1545-0813
Keyword(s) Agriculture
burnout
farmers
mental strain
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
PUBLIC, ENVIRONMENTAL & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH, SCI
PESTICIDE EXPOSURES
SUICIDE MORTALITY
AGRICULTURAL HEALTH
DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS
MIGRANT FARMWORKERS
RISK-FACTORS
NEW-ZEALAND
RESIDENTS
ENTREPRENEURS
WORKERS
Summary Dairy farm operators-farmers, workers, and family members-are faced with many demands and stressors in their daily work and these appear to be shared across countries and cultures. Dairy operators experience high psychosocial demands with respect to a hard work and production ethos, economic influences, and social and environmental responsibility. Furthermore, both traditional and industrial farms are highly dependent on external conditions, such as weather, fluctuating markets, and regulations from government authorities. Possible external stressors include disease outbreaks, taxes related to dairy production, and recent negative societal attitudes to farming in general. Dairy farm operators may have very few or no opportunities to influence and control these external conditions, demands, and expectations. High work demands and expectations coupled with low control and lack of social support can lead to a poor psychosocial work environment, with increased stress levels, ill mental health, depression, and, in the worst cases, suicide. Internationally, farmers with ill mental health have different health service options depending on their location. Regardless of location, it is initially the responsibility of the individual farmer and farm family to handle mental health and stress, which can be of short- or long-term duration. This paper reviews the literature on the topics of psychosocial working conditions, mental health, stress, depression, and suicide among dairy farm operators, farm workers, and farm family members in an international perspective.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/1059924X.2013.796903
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920506 Rural Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069857

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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