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Mentoring programs for indigenous youth at-risk

Ware,V 2013, Mentoring programs for indigenous youth at-risk, Autralian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra, A.C.T..

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Title Mentoring programs for indigenous youth at-risk
Author(s) Ware,VORCID iD for Ware,V orcid.org/0000-0002-5192-3097
Publication date 2013-09
Series Closing the Gap Clearinghouse Resource Sheets
Volume number 22
Total pages 20
Publisher Autralian Institute of Health and Welfare
Place of publication Canberra, A.C.T.
Summary There is a range of risk factors that may make young people of any ethnicity more likely to engage in antisocial behaviours. These factors include the young person’s own attitudes; relationships within the family; and growing up in communities where there is widespread violence, alcohol and other substance abuse, poverty, poor health and poor-quality housing. Indigenous young people face the additional challenges ofdispossession, discontinuity of culture and intergenerational trauma.A strong connection to culture—coupled with high self-esteem, a strong sense of autonomy, and with living in cohesive, functioning families and communities—can be protective factors that result in Indigenous young people choosing productive life pathways.Mentoring is a relationship intervention strategy that can assist in building some of these protective factors. A growing body of research demonstrates that mentoring can have powerful and lasting positive effects in improving behavioural, academic and vocational outcomes for at-risk youth and, to a more limited extent, in reducing contact with juvenile justice systems.In an Indigenous context, mentoring is a particularly promising initiative because it fits well with Indigenous teaching and learning styles and can help to build strong collective ties within a community.Mentoring programs can involve adult or peer mentors and can be implemented in a range of ways, such as one-on-one or in groups.Although positive results can be achieved with single-intervention mentoring for at risk youth, integrating mentoring into broader programs produces a greater level of positive change.The way the mentoring program is run and the nature of the relationship between mentor and mentee are crucial in determining the outcomes of youth mentoring programs.
ISBN 9781742494692
ISSN 2201-845X
Language eng
Indigenous content on
Field of Research 160501 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Policy
160508 Health Policy
160810 Urban Sociology and Community Studies
200201 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Studies
Socio Economic Objective 939901 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education
HERDC Research category A6.1 Research report/technical paper
Copyright notice ©2013, Autralian Institute of Health and Welfare
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069871

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.