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Lessons from silkworm cocoons for future protective materials design

Zhang,J, Jin,X, Hurren,CJ and Wang,X 2014, Lessons from silkworm cocoons for future protective materials design, in TIWC 2014 : Innovation from fibre to fashion : Proceedings of the 89th World Conference of the Textile Institute, Textile Institute World Conference, Wuhan, China, pp. 849-853.

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Title Lessons from silkworm cocoons for future protective materials design
Author(s) Zhang,JORCID iD for Zhang,J orcid.org/0000-0002-4257-8148
Jin,X
Hurren,CJORCID iD for Hurren,CJ orcid.org/0000-0002-3274-4675
Wang,X
Conference name Textile Institute. World Conference (89th: 2014: Wuhan, China)
Conference location Wuhan, China
Conference dates 2014/11/2 - 2014/11/6
Title of proceedings TIWC 2014 : Innovation from fibre to fashion : Proceedings of the 89th World Conference of the Textile Institute
Editor(s) Tang,B
Publication date 2014
Conference series Textile Institute World Conference
Start page 849
End page 853
Total pages 8
Publisher Textile Institute World Conference
Place of publication Wuhan, China
Summary  Evolved over millions of years’ natural selection, very thin and lightweight wild silkworm cocoons can protect silkworms from environmental hazards and physical attacks from predators while supporting their metabolic activity. The knowledge of structure-property-function relationship of multi-layered composite silk cocoon shells gives insight into the design of next-generation protection materials. The mechanical and thermal insulation properties of both domestic (Bombyx mori, or B. moriand Samia. cynthia, or S. cynthia) and wild (Antheraea pernyi and Antheraea mylitta, or A. pernyi and A. mylitta) silkworm cocoons were investigated. The research findings are of relevance to the bio-inspired design of new protective materials and structures.
The 180 degree peel tests and needle penetration tests were used for examining the peel resistance and needle penetration resistance of both domestic and wild silkworm cocoon walls. The temperatures inside and outside of the whole silkworm cocoons under warm, cold and windy conditions were monitored for investigating the cocoon’s thermal insulation function. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were created to simulate the heat transfer through the A. pernyi cocoon wall.
The wild cocoons experienced much higher peeling peak loads than the domestic cocoon. This transfers to a maximum work-of-fracture (WOF) of about 1000 J/m2 from the A. pernyi outer layer, which was 10 times of the B. mori cocoon. The A. pernyi wild cocoon exhibited a maximum penetration force (11 N) that is 70 % higher than a woven aramid fabric. Silk sericin is shown to play a critical role in providing needle penetration resistance of the non-woven composite cocoon structure by restricting the relative motion of fibres, which prevents the sharp tip of the needle from pushing aside fibres and penetrating between them. The wild A. pernyi cocoon exhibits superior thermal buffer over the domestic B. mori cocoon. The unique structure of the A. pernyi cocoon wall with mineral crystals deposited on the cocoon outer surface, can prohibit most of the air from flowing inside of the cocoon structure, which shows strong wind resistance under windy conditions.
Language eng
Field of Research 091012 Textile Technology
Socio Economic Objective 860403 Natural Fibres, Yarns and Fabrics
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Grant ID DP120100139
Copyright notice ©2014, Wuhan Textile University
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30069917

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.