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Safety and efficacy of antenatal milk expressing for women with diabetes in pregnancy: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Forster,DA, Jacobs,S, Amir,LH, Davis,P, Walker,SP, McEgan,K, Opie,G, Donath,SM, Moorhead,AM, Ford,R, McNamara,C, Aylward,A and Gold,L 2014, Safety and efficacy of antenatal milk expressing for women with diabetes in pregnancy: protocol for a randomised controlled trial, BMJ Open, vol. 4, no. 10, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006571.

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Title Safety and efficacy of antenatal milk expressing for women with diabetes in pregnancy: protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Forster,DA
Jacobs,S
Amir,LH
Davis,P
Walker,SP
McEgan,K
Opie,G
Donath,SM
Moorhead,AM
Ford,R
McNamara,C
Aylward,A
Gold,LORCID iD for Gold,L orcid.org/0000-0002-2733-900X
Journal name BMJ Open
Volume number 4
Issue number 10
Start page 1
End page 9
Publisher BMJ Group
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2014-10-30
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) NEONATOLOGY
NUTRITION & DIETETICS
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
BREAST EXPRESSION
MELLITUS
LACTOGENESIS
AUSTRALIA
MOTHERS
HEALTH
LACTATION
INJURIES
FAMILIES
DELIVERY
Summary Many maternity providers recommend that women with diabetes in pregnancy express and store breast milk in late pregnancy so breast milk is available after birth, given (1) infants of these women are at increased risk of hypoglycaemia in the first 24 h of life; and (2) the delay in lactogenesis II compared with women without diabetes that increases their infant's risk of receiving infant formula. The Diabetes and Antenatal Milk Expressing (DAME) trial will establish whether advising women with diabetes in pregnancy (pre-existing or gestational) to express breast milk from 36 weeks gestation increases the proportion of infants who require admission to special or neonatal intensive care units (SCN/NICU) compared with infants of women receiving standard care. Secondary outcomes include birth gestation, breastfeeding outcomes and economic impact.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006571
Field of Research 111707 Family Care
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, BMJ Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070043

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.